Most studies investigating the emerging adults’ (objective and subjective) financial well-being specifically focused on the main predictors of this construct, whereas only few studies tested the financial well-being as antecedent of possible outcomes during emerging adulthood. The current paper aims (1) to test the impact that the emerging adults’ subjective financial well-being (i.e., subjective perception of the own financial condition) has on their subjective and psychological well-being and (2) to verify if this relation is moderated by emerging adults’ individual differences respect to the way in which they can tolerate uncertainty and ambiguity. On a sample of 452 Italian and Portuguese participants (20–27 years old) a cluster analysis was performed in order to identify groups of emerging adults with similar patterns of uncertainty and ambiguity tolerance. We identified four groups: anxiety about ambiguity and uncertainty, comfort with ambiguity and uncertainty, black-and-white thinking, flexible thinking. Then, a multi-group path analysis was carried out in order to test if the relationships between the subjective financial well-being and the subjective and psychological well-being were invariant across groups. We found that the subjective financial well-being has a positive and invariant impact on the subjective well-being, whereas it has a positive but non-invariant impact on the psychological well-being. Implications of the results are discussed.

Iannello, P., Sorgente, A., Lanz, M., Antonietti, A., Financial Well-Being and Its Relationship with Subjective and Psychological Well-Being Among Emerging Adults: Testing the Moderating Effect of Individual Differences, <<JOURNAL OF HAPPINESS STUDIES>>, 2021; 22 (3): 1385-1411. [doi:10.1007/s10902-020-00277-x] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/179312]

Financial Well-Being and Its Relationship with Subjective and Psychological Well-Being Among Emerging Adults: Testing the Moderating Effect of Individual Differences

Iannello, Paola
Primo
;
Sorgente, Angela
Secondo
;
Lanz, Margherita
Penultimo
;
Antonietti, Alessandro
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

Most studies investigating the emerging adults’ (objective and subjective) financial well-being specifically focused on the main predictors of this construct, whereas only few studies tested the financial well-being as antecedent of possible outcomes during emerging adulthood. The current paper aims (1) to test the impact that the emerging adults’ subjective financial well-being (i.e., subjective perception of the own financial condition) has on their subjective and psychological well-being and (2) to verify if this relation is moderated by emerging adults’ individual differences respect to the way in which they can tolerate uncertainty and ambiguity. On a sample of 452 Italian and Portuguese participants (20–27 years old) a cluster analysis was performed in order to identify groups of emerging adults with similar patterns of uncertainty and ambiguity tolerance. We identified four groups: anxiety about ambiguity and uncertainty, comfort with ambiguity and uncertainty, black-and-white thinking, flexible thinking. Then, a multi-group path analysis was carried out in order to test if the relationships between the subjective financial well-being and the subjective and psychological well-being were invariant across groups. We found that the subjective financial well-being has a positive and invariant impact on the subjective well-being, whereas it has a positive but non-invariant impact on the psychological well-being. Implications of the results are discussed.
Inglese
Iannello, P., Sorgente, A., Lanz, M., Antonietti, A., Financial Well-Being and Its Relationship with Subjective and Psychological Well-Being Among Emerging Adults: Testing the Moderating Effect of Individual Differences, <<JOURNAL OF HAPPINESS STUDIES>>, 2021; 22 (3): 1385-1411. [doi:10.1007/s10902-020-00277-x] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/179312]
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10807/179312
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 17
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 13
social impact