An increasing number of studies have unveiled the nuanced nature of awe - a complex emotion stemming from stimuli so perceptually and conceptually vast to impact individuals’ current mental frames. Its positive impact on human wellbeing and health have been reported even after a single short exposure to awe-inspiring stimuli. Recently, Virtual Reality (VR) has emerged as a suitable technique for eliciting brief moments of intense awe. Moreover, nowadays, the Metaverse has increased the opportunity to access even complex experiences, such as awe, for a prolonged period. However, the impact of a prolonged exposure to an awe-inspiring simulated experience still must be investigated. Here, in the first study, we designed and tested usability, user experience and preliminary effectiveness of the first VR awe-inspiring training vs. an equivalent neutral training in VR. We relied on an immersive virtual reality online social platform- Altspace VR - for designing the training. In the second study, we investigated whether a prolonged exposure to awe could hold the same effect on creative thinking as it was demonstrated for brief exposure to awe in VR. Specifically, we tested the impact of a long-lasting exposure to awe on creative thinking in the short and on the long run (after the training and in a one-week follow-up) and vs. an equivalent neutral condition (the same as the first study). Creativity thinking, was assessed through Alternative Uses Task (AUT). Additionally, measures related to the disposition to feel positive emotions, social desirability and level of curiosity were collected. The first study supported the feasibility of the training together with the usability of the platform as well as its effectiveness in eliciting awe (vs. neutral condition). Moreover, for the second study, there was a main effect of time on some of the dimensions of creative thinking. Participants scored higher in fluency, originality, and flexibility one week after the training compared to the pre-training phase. These results suggested preliminary design guidelines for creating awe experiences in the Metaverse, unveiling the role of time exposure and duration of their effects on individuals.

Pizzolante, M., Borghesi, F., Sarcinella, E. D., Bartolotta, S., Salvi, C., Cipresso, P., Gaggioli, A., Chirico, A., Awe in the metaverse: Designing and validating a novel online virtual-reality awe-inspiring training, <<COMPUTERS IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR>>, 2023; 148 (N/A): N/A-N/A. [doi:10.1016/j.chb.2023.107876] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/260497]

Awe in the metaverse: Designing and validating a novel online virtual-reality awe-inspiring training

Pizzolante, Marta;Sarcinella, Eleonora Diletta;Bartolotta, Sabrina;Cipresso, Pietro;Gaggioli, Andrea;Chirico, Alice
2023

Abstract

An increasing number of studies have unveiled the nuanced nature of awe - a complex emotion stemming from stimuli so perceptually and conceptually vast to impact individuals’ current mental frames. Its positive impact on human wellbeing and health have been reported even after a single short exposure to awe-inspiring stimuli. Recently, Virtual Reality (VR) has emerged as a suitable technique for eliciting brief moments of intense awe. Moreover, nowadays, the Metaverse has increased the opportunity to access even complex experiences, such as awe, for a prolonged period. However, the impact of a prolonged exposure to an awe-inspiring simulated experience still must be investigated. Here, in the first study, we designed and tested usability, user experience and preliminary effectiveness of the first VR awe-inspiring training vs. an equivalent neutral training in VR. We relied on an immersive virtual reality online social platform- Altspace VR - for designing the training. In the second study, we investigated whether a prolonged exposure to awe could hold the same effect on creative thinking as it was demonstrated for brief exposure to awe in VR. Specifically, we tested the impact of a long-lasting exposure to awe on creative thinking in the short and on the long run (after the training and in a one-week follow-up) and vs. an equivalent neutral condition (the same as the first study). Creativity thinking, was assessed through Alternative Uses Task (AUT). Additionally, measures related to the disposition to feel positive emotions, social desirability and level of curiosity were collected. The first study supported the feasibility of the training together with the usability of the platform as well as its effectiveness in eliciting awe (vs. neutral condition). Moreover, for the second study, there was a main effect of time on some of the dimensions of creative thinking. Participants scored higher in fluency, originality, and flexibility one week after the training compared to the pre-training phase. These results suggested preliminary design guidelines for creating awe experiences in the Metaverse, unveiling the role of time exposure and duration of their effects on individuals.
2023
Inglese
Pizzolante, M., Borghesi, F., Sarcinella, E. D., Bartolotta, S., Salvi, C., Cipresso, P., Gaggioli, A., Chirico, A., Awe in the metaverse: Designing and validating a novel online virtual-reality awe-inspiring training, <<COMPUTERS IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR>>, 2023; 148 (N/A): N/A-N/A. [doi:10.1016/j.chb.2023.107876] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/260497]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/260497
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