Background: Postoperative seizures (PS) occur in 10-15% of patients. This study aims to provide an update on the role of surgery in PS. Methods: All children undergoing a craniotomy for supratentorial lesions in the last 10 years were considered except those with preoperative seizures, perioperative antiepileptic drugs prophylaxis, head-injury and infections, repeated surgery, or preoperative hyponatremia. Children undergoing surgery for intra-axial lesions (Group 1, 74 cases) were compared with those harboring extra-axial lesions (Group 2, 91 cases). Results: PS occurred in 9% of 165 cases and epilepsy in 3% of 165 cases (mean follow-up: 5.7 years). There was no difference between the two study groups with regard to demographic data or tumor size. Group 1 showed a higher rate of gross total tumor resection (p = 0.002), while Group 2 had a higher rate of postoperative hyponatremia (p < 0.0001). There were no differences between the two groups in the occurrence of seizures (6.7% vs. 11%) or epilepsy (2.7% vs. 3.2%). No correlations were found between seizures and age, tumor location, histotype, tumor size, or the extent of tumor resection. Hyponatremia affected the risk of PS in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusions: This study shows a lower rate of PS and epilepsy than series including children with preoperative seizures. Hyponatremia has a significant role. Neurosurgery is safe but surgical complications may cause late epilepsy.

Massimi, L., Frassanito, P., Bianchi, F., Fiorillo, L., Battaglia, D. I., Tamburrini, G., Postoperative Epileptic Seizures in Children, <<CHILDREN>>, 2022; 9 (10): 1-12. [doi:10.3390/children9101465] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/235951]

Postoperative Epileptic Seizures in Children

Massimi, Luca;Frassanito, Paolo;Bianchi, Federico;Battaglia, Domenica Immacolata;Tamburrini, Gianpiero
2022

Abstract

Background: Postoperative seizures (PS) occur in 10-15% of patients. This study aims to provide an update on the role of surgery in PS. Methods: All children undergoing a craniotomy for supratentorial lesions in the last 10 years were considered except those with preoperative seizures, perioperative antiepileptic drugs prophylaxis, head-injury and infections, repeated surgery, or preoperative hyponatremia. Children undergoing surgery for intra-axial lesions (Group 1, 74 cases) were compared with those harboring extra-axial lesions (Group 2, 91 cases). Results: PS occurred in 9% of 165 cases and epilepsy in 3% of 165 cases (mean follow-up: 5.7 years). There was no difference between the two study groups with regard to demographic data or tumor size. Group 1 showed a higher rate of gross total tumor resection (p = 0.002), while Group 2 had a higher rate of postoperative hyponatremia (p < 0.0001). There were no differences between the two groups in the occurrence of seizures (6.7% vs. 11%) or epilepsy (2.7% vs. 3.2%). No correlations were found between seizures and age, tumor location, histotype, tumor size, or the extent of tumor resection. Hyponatremia affected the risk of PS in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusions: This study shows a lower rate of PS and epilepsy than series including children with preoperative seizures. Hyponatremia has a significant role. Neurosurgery is safe but surgical complications may cause late epilepsy.
2022
Inglese
Massimi, L., Frassanito, P., Bianchi, F., Fiorillo, L., Battaglia, D. I., Tamburrini, G., Postoperative Epileptic Seizures in Children, <<CHILDREN>>, 2022; 9 (10): 1-12. [doi:10.3390/children9101465] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/235951]
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
children Poat operative seizure.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia file ?: Versione Editoriale (PDF)
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 2.36 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
2.36 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/235951
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 1
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact