Background This meta-analysis aims to assess the effectiveness of the current Sars-Cov2 vaccine regimens against Omicron infection. A secondary endpoint aims to investigate the waning effectiveness of primary vaccination against symptomatic infection and related hospitalization. Research design and methods The systematic review started on 1 December 2021 and was concluded on 1 March 2022. Random-effects frequentist meta-analyses and multiple meta-regressions were performed. Results In total, 15 studies are included in the quantitative synthesis. According to the meta-analysis results, the overall risk of Sars-Cov2 infection in vaccinated individuals is on average 31 center dot 5% lower than the infection risk in unvaccinated while vaccinated with one booster dose have a 70 center dot 4% risk reduction of Omicron infection compared to unvaccinated. In particular, one booster dose significantly decreases by 69% the risk of symptomatic Omicron infection with respect to unvaccinated. Six months after the primary vaccination, the average risk reduction declines to 22% against symptomatic infection and to 55% against hospitalization. Conclusions Primary vaccination does not provide sufficient protection against symptomatic Omicron infection. Although the effectiveness of the primary vaccination against hospitalization due to Omicron remains significantly above 50% after 3 months, it dramatically fades after 6 months.

Meggiolaro, A., Sane Schepisi, M., Farina, S., Castagna, C., Mammone, A., Siddu, A., Stefanelli, P., Boccia, S., Rezza, G., Effectiveness of vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant infection, symptomatic disease, and hospitalization: a systematic review and meta-analysis, <<EXPERT REVIEW OF VACCINES>>, 2022; 21 (12): 1831-1841. [doi:10.1080/14760584.2022.2130773] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/225951]

Effectiveness of vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant infection, symptomatic disease, and hospitalization: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Farina, Sara;Castagna, Carolina;Stefanelli, Paola;Boccia, Stefania;Rezza, Giovanni
2022

Abstract

Background This meta-analysis aims to assess the effectiveness of the current Sars-Cov2 vaccine regimens against Omicron infection. A secondary endpoint aims to investigate the waning effectiveness of primary vaccination against symptomatic infection and related hospitalization. Research design and methods The systematic review started on 1 December 2021 and was concluded on 1 March 2022. Random-effects frequentist meta-analyses and multiple meta-regressions were performed. Results In total, 15 studies are included in the quantitative synthesis. According to the meta-analysis results, the overall risk of Sars-Cov2 infection in vaccinated individuals is on average 31 center dot 5% lower than the infection risk in unvaccinated while vaccinated with one booster dose have a 70 center dot 4% risk reduction of Omicron infection compared to unvaccinated. In particular, one booster dose significantly decreases by 69% the risk of symptomatic Omicron infection with respect to unvaccinated. Six months after the primary vaccination, the average risk reduction declines to 22% against symptomatic infection and to 55% against hospitalization. Conclusions Primary vaccination does not provide sufficient protection against symptomatic Omicron infection. Although the effectiveness of the primary vaccination against hospitalization due to Omicron remains significantly above 50% after 3 months, it dramatically fades after 6 months.
2022
Inglese
Meggiolaro, A., Sane Schepisi, M., Farina, S., Castagna, C., Mammone, A., Siddu, A., Stefanelli, P., Boccia, S., Rezza, G., Effectiveness of vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant infection, symptomatic disease, and hospitalization: a systematic review and meta-analysis, <<EXPERT REVIEW OF VACCINES>>, 2022; 21 (12): 1831-1841. [doi:10.1080/14760584.2022.2130773] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/225951]
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Meggiolano ERVacc 2022.pdf

accesso aperto

Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 6.59 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
6.59 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/225951
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 2
  • Scopus 11
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 9
social impact