Aphasia is an acquired deficit following acute damage to the central nervous system that involves the difficulty or impossibility of understanding and formulating language. A typical disorder of non-fluent forms of aphasia is anomia. Anomia refers to the difficulty in finding words, in particular when trying to name objects and actions. According to the Embodied Cognition approach (EC), language is tightly connected to the motor system. In this view, language rehabilitation programs should stimulate language through the activation of the motor system. In this approach, since anomic deficits are often due to a weak link between the meaning of the word and its lemma, the Hebbs’ principles of coincident and correlated learning can be exploited, i.e., by intensifying the synchronous activation of lexicon and semantics and connecting them with the motor counterpart. In this study, we present an innovative training, based on the EC framework, in which we will make use of new technologies for anomia rehabilitation in post-stroke patients. Specifically, we will use immersive 360° videos representing everyday actions displayed from the first-person point of view, experienced through a head-mounted display. The training will be administered 3 times a week for 4 weeks. The control group will watch standard videos representing the same actions recorded from the third-person perspective. Naming abilities will be tested before and after the training together with other cognitive and psychological measures. We expect that the group who will undergo the 360° video-based training will show greater improvement of performance compared to the control group.

Repetto, C., Cancer, A., Rodella, C., Campagna, M., Maietti, A., Aphasia360°: A virtual reality intervention for anomia rehabilitation in post-stroke patients, <<ANNUAL REVIEW OF CYBERTHERAPY AND TELEMEDICINE>>, 2021; 19 (NA): 111-115 [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/215766]

Aphasia360°: A virtual reality intervention for anomia rehabilitation in post-stroke patients

Repetto, C.;Cancer, A.;Rodella, C.;Maietti, A.
2021

Abstract

Aphasia is an acquired deficit following acute damage to the central nervous system that involves the difficulty or impossibility of understanding and formulating language. A typical disorder of non-fluent forms of aphasia is anomia. Anomia refers to the difficulty in finding words, in particular when trying to name objects and actions. According to the Embodied Cognition approach (EC), language is tightly connected to the motor system. In this view, language rehabilitation programs should stimulate language through the activation of the motor system. In this approach, since anomic deficits are often due to a weak link between the meaning of the word and its lemma, the Hebbs’ principles of coincident and correlated learning can be exploited, i.e., by intensifying the synchronous activation of lexicon and semantics and connecting them with the motor counterpart. In this study, we present an innovative training, based on the EC framework, in which we will make use of new technologies for anomia rehabilitation in post-stroke patients. Specifically, we will use immersive 360° videos representing everyday actions displayed from the first-person point of view, experienced through a head-mounted display. The training will be administered 3 times a week for 4 weeks. The control group will watch standard videos representing the same actions recorded from the third-person perspective. Naming abilities will be tested before and after the training together with other cognitive and psychological measures. We expect that the group who will undergo the 360° video-based training will show greater improvement of performance compared to the control group.
Inglese
Repetto, C., Cancer, A., Rodella, C., Campagna, M., Maietti, A., Aphasia360°: A virtual reality intervention for anomia rehabilitation in post-stroke patients, <<ANNUAL REVIEW OF CYBERTHERAPY AND TELEMEDICINE>>, 2021; 19 (NA): 111-115 [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/215766]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/215766
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