Recent studies in the agronomic field indicate that the exogenous application of polyphenols can provide tolerance against various stresses in plants. However, the molecular processes underlying stress mitigation remain unclear, and little is known about the impact of exogenously applied phenolics, especially in combination with salinity. In this work, the impacts of exogenously applied chlorogenic acid (CA), hesperidin (HES), and their combination (HES + CA) have been investigated in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) through untargeted metabolomics to evaluate mitigation effects against salinity. Growth parameters, physiological measurements, leaf relative water content, and osmotic potential as well as gas exchange parameters were also measured. As expected, salinity produced a significant decline in the physiological and biochemical parameters of lettuce. However, the treatments with exogenous phenolics, particularly HES and HES + CA, allowed lettuce to cope with salt stress condition. Interestingly, the treatments triggered a broad metabolic reprogramming that involved secondary metabolism and small molecules such as electron carriers, enzyme cofactors, and vitamins. Under salinity conditions, CA and HES + CA distinctively elicited secondary metabolism, nitrogen-containing compounds, osmoprotectants, and polyamines.

Zhang, L., Miras-Moreno, M. B., Yildiztugay, E., Ozfidan-Konakci, C., Arikan, B., Elbasan, F., Ak, G., Rouphael, Y., Zengin, G., Lucini, L., Metabolomics and physiological insights into the ability of exogenously applied chlorogenic acid and hesperidin to modulate salt stress in lettuce distinctively, <<MOLECULES>>, 2021; 26 (20): 6291-6291. [doi:10.3390/molecules26206291] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/204621]

Metabolomics and physiological insights into the ability of exogenously applied chlorogenic acid and hesperidin to modulate salt stress in lettuce distinctively

Zhang, L.;Miras-Moreno, M. B.;Lucini, L.
2021

Abstract

Recent studies in the agronomic field indicate that the exogenous application of polyphenols can provide tolerance against various stresses in plants. However, the molecular processes underlying stress mitigation remain unclear, and little is known about the impact of exogenously applied phenolics, especially in combination with salinity. In this work, the impacts of exogenously applied chlorogenic acid (CA), hesperidin (HES), and their combination (HES + CA) have been investigated in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) through untargeted metabolomics to evaluate mitigation effects against salinity. Growth parameters, physiological measurements, leaf relative water content, and osmotic potential as well as gas exchange parameters were also measured. As expected, salinity produced a significant decline in the physiological and biochemical parameters of lettuce. However, the treatments with exogenous phenolics, particularly HES and HES + CA, allowed lettuce to cope with salt stress condition. Interestingly, the treatments triggered a broad metabolic reprogramming that involved secondary metabolism and small molecules such as electron carriers, enzyme cofactors, and vitamins. Under salinity conditions, CA and HES + CA distinctively elicited secondary metabolism, nitrogen-containing compounds, osmoprotectants, and polyamines.
Inglese
Zhang, L., Miras-Moreno, M. B., Yildiztugay, E., Ozfidan-Konakci, C., Arikan, B., Elbasan, F., Ak, G., Rouphael, Y., Zengin, G., Lucini, L., Metabolomics and physiological insights into the ability of exogenously applied chlorogenic acid and hesperidin to modulate salt stress in lettuce distinctively, <<MOLECULES>>, 2021; 26 (20): 6291-6291. [doi:10.3390/molecules26206291] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/204621]
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/204621
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 1
  • Scopus 4
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 4
social impact