Background: Physiological and pathological brain aging plays a central role in brain network modulation. The aim of the present article was to assess the stability of a proposed method for evaluation of small-world (SW) characteristics for the study of the human connectome. Subjects and Methods: Eighty subjects were recruited: 36 young healthy controls, 32 elderly healthy controls, and 12 patients affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). Electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded during six separate sessions (480 recordings) at an average intersession interval of 3.8 ± 0.2 days. We applied graph theory functions to the weighted and undirected networks obtained by the lagged linear coherence estimated by exact low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA). We explored the following frequency bands: delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha 1 (8-10.5 Hz), alpha 2 (10.5-13 Hz), beta 1 (13-20 Hz), beta 2 (20-30 Hz), and gamma (30-40 Hz). Results: The proposed method for evaluation of SW characteristics exhibited good reproducibility and stability. Furthermore, results showed the pattern, Young>Elderly>AD, in low-frequency delta and theta bands and vice versa in the higher alpha band. Finally, a correlation with age was confirmed in healthy subjects, showing that the older the age, the higher the SW values for alpha 2. Discussion: Evidences from the present study confirm the stability of the SW index and suggest that the analysis of connectivity patterns evaluated from EEGs can be supported by the graph theory. The proposed method for evaluation of SW characteristics has shown good reproducibility and stability. This technique, applied to patient data, could provide more information on the pathophysiological processes underlying age-related brain disconnection, as well as on administration of rehabilitation treatments at the right time, which could allow patients to avoid unnecessary interventions. The graph analysis tools described in this study represent an interesting approach to study the distinctive characteristics of physiological aging by focusing on functional connectivity networks. The proposed method for evaluation of small-world characteristics has shown good reproducibility and stability. This technique, applied to patient data, could provide more information on the pathophysiological processes underlying age-related brain disconnection, as well as on delivery of rehabilitation treatments at the right time, which could allow patients to avoid unnecessary interventions.

Vecchio, F., Miraglia, F., Alu, F., Judica, E., Cotelli, M., Pellicciari, M. C., Rossini, P. M., Human Brain Networks in Physiological and Pathological Aging: Reproducibility of Electroencephalogram Graph Theoretical Analysis in Cortical Connectivity, <<BRAIN CONNECTIVITY>>, 2022; 12 (1): 41-51. [doi:10.1089/brain.2020.0824] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/202684]

Human Brain Networks in Physiological and Pathological Aging: Reproducibility of Electroencephalogram Graph Theoretical Analysis in Cortical Connectivity

Cotelli, M.;
2022

Abstract

Background: Physiological and pathological brain aging plays a central role in brain network modulation. The aim of the present article was to assess the stability of a proposed method for evaluation of small-world (SW) characteristics for the study of the human connectome. Subjects and Methods: Eighty subjects were recruited: 36 young healthy controls, 32 elderly healthy controls, and 12 patients affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). Electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded during six separate sessions (480 recordings) at an average intersession interval of 3.8 ± 0.2 days. We applied graph theory functions to the weighted and undirected networks obtained by the lagged linear coherence estimated by exact low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA). We explored the following frequency bands: delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha 1 (8-10.5 Hz), alpha 2 (10.5-13 Hz), beta 1 (13-20 Hz), beta 2 (20-30 Hz), and gamma (30-40 Hz). Results: The proposed method for evaluation of SW characteristics exhibited good reproducibility and stability. Furthermore, results showed the pattern, Young>Elderly>AD, in low-frequency delta and theta bands and vice versa in the higher alpha band. Finally, a correlation with age was confirmed in healthy subjects, showing that the older the age, the higher the SW values for alpha 2. Discussion: Evidences from the present study confirm the stability of the SW index and suggest that the analysis of connectivity patterns evaluated from EEGs can be supported by the graph theory. The proposed method for evaluation of SW characteristics has shown good reproducibility and stability. This technique, applied to patient data, could provide more information on the pathophysiological processes underlying age-related brain disconnection, as well as on administration of rehabilitation treatments at the right time, which could allow patients to avoid unnecessary interventions. The graph analysis tools described in this study represent an interesting approach to study the distinctive characteristics of physiological aging by focusing on functional connectivity networks. The proposed method for evaluation of small-world characteristics has shown good reproducibility and stability. This technique, applied to patient data, could provide more information on the pathophysiological processes underlying age-related brain disconnection, as well as on delivery of rehabilitation treatments at the right time, which could allow patients to avoid unnecessary interventions.
2022
Inglese
Vecchio, F., Miraglia, F., Alu, F., Judica, E., Cotelli, M., Pellicciari, M. C., Rossini, P. M., Human Brain Networks in Physiological and Pathological Aging: Reproducibility of Electroencephalogram Graph Theoretical Analysis in Cortical Connectivity, <<BRAIN CONNECTIVITY>>, 2022; 12 (1): 41-51. [doi:10.1089/brain.2020.0824] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/202684]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/202684
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