Surgical site infections represent a considerable burden for healthcare systems. To obtain a consensus on the impact and future clinical and economic needs regarding SSI management in an era of multidrug resistance. A modified Delphi method was used to obtain consensus among experts from five European countries. The Delphi questionnaire was assembled by a steering committee, verified by a panel of experts and administered to 90 experts in 8 different surgical specialities (Abdominal, Cancer, Cardiac, General surgery, Orthopaedic, Thoracic, Transplant and Vascular and three other specialities (infectious disease, internal medicine microbiology). Respondents (n = 52) reached consensus on 62/73 items including that resistant pathogens are an increasing matter of concern and increase both treatment complexity and the length of hospital stay. There was strong positive consensus on the cost-effectiveness of early discharge (ED) programs, improvement of quality of life with ED and association between increased length of stay and economic burden to the hospital. However, established ED protocols were not widely available in their hospitals. Respondents expressed a positive consensus on the usefulness of antibiotics that allow ED. Surgeons are aware of their responsibility in an interdisciplinary team for the treatment of SSI, and of the impact of multidrug-resistant bacteria in the context of SSI. Reducing the length of hospital stays by applying ED protocols and implementing new treatment alternatives is crucial to reduce harm to patients and costs for the hospital.

Sganga, G., Baguneid, M., Dohmen, P., Giamarellos-bourboulis, E. J., Romanini, E., Vozikis, A., Eckmann, C., Management of superficial and deep surgical site infection: an international multidisciplinary consensus, <<UPDATES IN SURGERY>>, 2021; (n/a): N/A-N/A. [doi:10.1007/s13304-021-01029-z] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/179367]

Management of superficial and deep surgical site infection: an international multidisciplinary consensus

Sganga G.;Romanini E.;
2021

Abstract

Surgical site infections represent a considerable burden for healthcare systems. To obtain a consensus on the impact and future clinical and economic needs regarding SSI management in an era of multidrug resistance. A modified Delphi method was used to obtain consensus among experts from five European countries. The Delphi questionnaire was assembled by a steering committee, verified by a panel of experts and administered to 90 experts in 8 different surgical specialities (Abdominal, Cancer, Cardiac, General surgery, Orthopaedic, Thoracic, Transplant and Vascular and three other specialities (infectious disease, internal medicine microbiology). Respondents (n = 52) reached consensus on 62/73 items including that resistant pathogens are an increasing matter of concern and increase both treatment complexity and the length of hospital stay. There was strong positive consensus on the cost-effectiveness of early discharge (ED) programs, improvement of quality of life with ED and association between increased length of stay and economic burden to the hospital. However, established ED protocols were not widely available in their hospitals. Respondents expressed a positive consensus on the usefulness of antibiotics that allow ED. Surgeons are aware of their responsibility in an interdisciplinary team for the treatment of SSI, and of the impact of multidrug-resistant bacteria in the context of SSI. Reducing the length of hospital stays by applying ED protocols and implementing new treatment alternatives is crucial to reduce harm to patients and costs for the hospital.
Inglese
Sganga, G., Baguneid, M., Dohmen, P., Giamarellos-bourboulis, E. J., Romanini, E., Vozikis, A., Eckmann, C., Management of superficial and deep surgical site infection: an international multidisciplinary consensus, <>, 2021; (n/a): N/A-N/A. [doi:10.1007/s13304-021-01029-z] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/179367]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10807/179367
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