It has been proposed that vaccines may exert an unspecific protective effect against infectious agents, different than expected. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a pandemic infection with high mortality in older patients due to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The high number of vaccinations may be one of the reasons why children show a lower susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection and milder severity when compared to adults. We have designed a study aimed at investigating whether the influenza vaccine may reduce the susceptibility and severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection. We retrospectively enrolled 635 patients who accessed our Emergency Department from March 1st to June 30th, 2020, and were diagnosed with COVID-19 infection confirmed by an RT-PCR on an oropharyngeal swab. Clinical data, outcomes, and influenza vaccination status were collected from the electronic medical records of our Hospital. We also used data from the Italian Health Ministry to compare the prevalence of flu vaccination among the general population of the Lazio Region and our enrolled patients. We then compared clinical outcomes between vaccinated and non-vaccinated patients, by univariate and multivariate analysis. COVID-19-positive patients older than 65 years reported a lower prevalence of flu vaccination when compared to the general population residing in the Lazio (p = 0.004). After correction for gender, age, and comorbidities, we found a lower risk of death at 60 days in patients with flu vaccination than in not vaccinated patients (p = 0.001). Our study shows that flu vaccination could reduce the mortality of COVID-19. Prospective studies are needed to confirm this result

Candelli, M., Pignataro, G., Torelli, E., Gulli', A., Nista, E. C., Petrucci, M., Saviano, A., Marchesini, D., Covino, M., Ojetti, V., Antonelli, M., Gasbarrini, A., Franceschi, F., Effect of influenza vaccine on COVID‑19 mortality: a retrospective study, <<INTERNAL AND EMERGENCY MEDICINE>>, 2021; (Volume 16, issue 2, Marzo 2021): 1-7. [doi:10.1007/s11739-021-02702-2] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/176472]

Effect of influenza vaccine on COVID‑19 mortality: a retrospective study

Candelli, Marcello
Primo
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Pignataro, Giulia
Investigation
;
Torelli, Enrico
Data Curation
;
Gulli', Antonio
Data Curation
;
Nista, Enrico Celestino
Data Curation
;
Petrucci, Martina
Data Curation
;
Saviano, Angela
Data Curation
;
Marchesini, Debora
Data Curation
;
Covino, Marcello
Visualization
;
Ojetti, Veronica
Visualization
;
Antonelli, Massimo
Supervision
;
Gasbarrini, Antonio
Supervision
;
Franceschi, Francesco
Ultimo
Supervision
2021

Abstract

It has been proposed that vaccines may exert an unspecific protective effect against infectious agents, different than expected. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a pandemic infection with high mortality in older patients due to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The high number of vaccinations may be one of the reasons why children show a lower susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection and milder severity when compared to adults. We have designed a study aimed at investigating whether the influenza vaccine may reduce the susceptibility and severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection. We retrospectively enrolled 635 patients who accessed our Emergency Department from March 1st to June 30th, 2020, and were diagnosed with COVID-19 infection confirmed by an RT-PCR on an oropharyngeal swab. Clinical data, outcomes, and influenza vaccination status were collected from the electronic medical records of our Hospital. We also used data from the Italian Health Ministry to compare the prevalence of flu vaccination among the general population of the Lazio Region and our enrolled patients. We then compared clinical outcomes between vaccinated and non-vaccinated patients, by univariate and multivariate analysis. COVID-19-positive patients older than 65 years reported a lower prevalence of flu vaccination when compared to the general population residing in the Lazio (p = 0.004). After correction for gender, age, and comorbidities, we found a lower risk of death at 60 days in patients with flu vaccination than in not vaccinated patients (p = 0.001). Our study shows that flu vaccination could reduce the mortality of COVID-19. Prospective studies are needed to confirm this result
2021
Inglese
Candelli, M., Pignataro, G., Torelli, E., Gulli', A., Nista, E. C., Petrucci, M., Saviano, A., Marchesini, D., Covino, M., Ojetti, V., Antonelli, M., Gasbarrini, A., Franceschi, F., Effect of influenza vaccine on COVID‑19 mortality: a retrospective study, <<INTERNAL AND EMERGENCY MEDICINE>>, 2021; (Volume 16, issue 2, Marzo 2021): 1-7. [doi:10.1007/s11739-021-02702-2] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/176472]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/176472
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