Background Whether mindfulness and emotional intelligence may counteract psychological symptoms and whether brooding and worry may be linked to decreased psychological well-being (PWB) in individuals with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is still an issue. Methods The study used a cross-sectional design on a sample of 66 consecutive individuals with a diagnosis of GAD. Two hierarchical multiple regressions were conducted to determine whether PWB and anxiety symptoms were accounted for by mindfulness and emotional intelligence skills, brooding, and worry. Results Worry was negatively related to PWB and showed a tendency to be positively associated with anxiety symptoms after controlling for the other variables. Brooding was uniquely and positively related to anxiety symptoms. Different mindfulness (i.e., describing and nonjudging) and emotional intelligence (i.e., attention and repair) skills were particularly important for PWB. Repair was also negatively related to anxiety symptoms. Conclusions Repair was the variable that played a key role in the association with both PWB and GAD symptoms. Worry was the second most important variable, although it approached significance in the relationship with anxiety symptoms. Brooding was more strongly positively associated with anxiety than worry. In sum, the results suggest that an integrated and balanced focus on both positive and negative functioning will be useful in future clinical psychology research to predict, understand, and treat anxiety as well as to examine the antecedents and characteristics of positivity in individuals with GAD and promote their PWB.

Iani, L., Quinto, R. M., Lauriola, M., Crosta, M. L., Pozzi, G., Psychological well-being and distress in patients with generalized anxiety disorder: The roles of positive and negative functioning, <<PLOS ONE>>, 2019; 14 (11): e0225646-N/A. [doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0225646] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/170702]

Psychological well-being and distress in patients with generalized anxiety disorder: The roles of positive and negative functioning

Lauriola M.;Crosta M. L.;Pozzi G.
2019

Abstract

Background Whether mindfulness and emotional intelligence may counteract psychological symptoms and whether brooding and worry may be linked to decreased psychological well-being (PWB) in individuals with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is still an issue. Methods The study used a cross-sectional design on a sample of 66 consecutive individuals with a diagnosis of GAD. Two hierarchical multiple regressions were conducted to determine whether PWB and anxiety symptoms were accounted for by mindfulness and emotional intelligence skills, brooding, and worry. Results Worry was negatively related to PWB and showed a tendency to be positively associated with anxiety symptoms after controlling for the other variables. Brooding was uniquely and positively related to anxiety symptoms. Different mindfulness (i.e., describing and nonjudging) and emotional intelligence (i.e., attention and repair) skills were particularly important for PWB. Repair was also negatively related to anxiety symptoms. Conclusions Repair was the variable that played a key role in the association with both PWB and GAD symptoms. Worry was the second most important variable, although it approached significance in the relationship with anxiety symptoms. Brooding was more strongly positively associated with anxiety than worry. In sum, the results suggest that an integrated and balanced focus on both positive and negative functioning will be useful in future clinical psychology research to predict, understand, and treat anxiety as well as to examine the antecedents and characteristics of positivity in individuals with GAD and promote their PWB.
Inglese
Iani, L., Quinto, R. M., Lauriola, M., Crosta, M. L., Pozzi, G., Psychological well-being and distress in patients with generalized anxiety disorder: The roles of positive and negative functioning, <>, 2019; 14 (11): e0225646-N/A. [doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0225646] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/170702]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10807/170702
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