Although the 2003 crisis between Europe and the US seems to be over, the future of the transatlantic alliance still depends on the allies’ ability to strike a new bargain. To be successful, such a new bargain must prove able to exploit the asymmetries of the alliance. In this respect, the approach to military innovation in Europe and the US might be a major opportunity, as well as a liability: in fact, while the US spent the past 15 years trying to implement what was originally labeled as “Revolution in Military Affairs”, most European states proved much more reluctant to embark in a serious process of transformation. The result is the so-called technology gap – the purported European backwardness in military technology vis-à-vis the United States. According to the mainstream literature, to strike a new bargain, Europe will have to catch up with the US in order to make the alliance more balanced. On the contrary, I will argue that not only the reasons to bridge the gap may be dismissed, but also that a degree of asymmetry in military technology might be in the alliance’s interest – namely, by creating a sort of specialization between the two shores of the Atlantic. In order to support my argument, I will first provide a description of the technology gap. Then, I will then consider its implications by the light of the war in Kosovo. Finally, I will discuss the rationale for bridging the gap providing a list of counter-arguments.

Locatelli, A., The Technology Gap in Transatlantic Relations: A Cause of Tension or a Tool of Cooperation?, <<JOURNAL OF TRANSATLANTIC STUDIES>>, 2007; (2): 133-154 [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/15069]

The Technology Gap in Transatlantic Relations: A Cause of Tension or a Tool of Cooperation?

Locatelli, Andrea
2007

Abstract

Although the 2003 crisis between Europe and the US seems to be over, the future of the transatlantic alliance still depends on the allies’ ability to strike a new bargain. To be successful, such a new bargain must prove able to exploit the asymmetries of the alliance. In this respect, the approach to military innovation in Europe and the US might be a major opportunity, as well as a liability: in fact, while the US spent the past 15 years trying to implement what was originally labeled as “Revolution in Military Affairs”, most European states proved much more reluctant to embark in a serious process of transformation. The result is the so-called technology gap – the purported European backwardness in military technology vis-à-vis the United States. According to the mainstream literature, to strike a new bargain, Europe will have to catch up with the US in order to make the alliance more balanced. On the contrary, I will argue that not only the reasons to bridge the gap may be dismissed, but also that a degree of asymmetry in military technology might be in the alliance’s interest – namely, by creating a sort of specialization between the two shores of the Atlantic. In order to support my argument, I will first provide a description of the technology gap. Then, I will then consider its implications by the light of the war in Kosovo. Finally, I will discuss the rationale for bridging the gap providing a list of counter-arguments.
Inglese
Locatelli, A., The Technology Gap in Transatlantic Relations: A Cause of Tension or a Tool of Cooperation?, <>, 2007; (2): 133-154 [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/15069]
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10807/15069
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 6
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact