Background: Parkinson's Disease (PD) with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (PD-MCI) represents one of the most dreaded complications for patients with PD and is associated with a higher risk of developing dementia. Although transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been demonstrated to improve motor and non-motor symptoms in PD, to date, no study has investigated the effects of tDCS on Theory of Mind (ToM), i.e., the ability to understand and predict other people's behaviours, in PD-MCI. Methods: In this randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study, we applied active tDCS over the medial frontal cortex (MFC) to modulate ToM performance in twenty patients with PD-MCI. Twenty matched healthy controls (HC) were also enrolled and were asked to perform the ToM task without receiving tDCS. Results: In the patients with PD-MCI, i) ToM performance was worse than that in the HC, ii) ToM abilities were poorer in those with fronto-executive difficulties, and iii) tDCS over the MFC led to significant shortening of latency for ToM tasks. Conclusions: We show for the first time that active tDCS over the MFC enhances ToM in patients with PD-MCI, and suggest that non-invasive brain stimulation could be used to ameliorate ToM deficits observed in these patients.

Adenzato, M., Manenti, R., Enrici, I., Gobbi, E., Brambilla, M., Alberici, A., Cotelli, M. S., Padovani, A., Borroni, B., Cotelli, M., Transcranial direct current stimulation enhances theory of mind in Parkinson's disease patients with mild cognitive impairment: a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study, <<TRANSLATIONAL NEURODEGENERATION>>, 2019; 8 (1): 1-13. [doi:10.1186/s40035-018-0141-9] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/131683]

Transcranial direct current stimulation enhances theory of mind in Parkinson's disease patients with mild cognitive impairment: a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study

Manenti, Rosa;Cotelli, Maria
2019

Abstract

Background: Parkinson's Disease (PD) with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (PD-MCI) represents one of the most dreaded complications for patients with PD and is associated with a higher risk of developing dementia. Although transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been demonstrated to improve motor and non-motor symptoms in PD, to date, no study has investigated the effects of tDCS on Theory of Mind (ToM), i.e., the ability to understand and predict other people's behaviours, in PD-MCI. Methods: In this randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study, we applied active tDCS over the medial frontal cortex (MFC) to modulate ToM performance in twenty patients with PD-MCI. Twenty matched healthy controls (HC) were also enrolled and were asked to perform the ToM task without receiving tDCS. Results: In the patients with PD-MCI, i) ToM performance was worse than that in the HC, ii) ToM abilities were poorer in those with fronto-executive difficulties, and iii) tDCS over the MFC led to significant shortening of latency for ToM tasks. Conclusions: We show for the first time that active tDCS over the MFC enhances ToM in patients with PD-MCI, and suggest that non-invasive brain stimulation could be used to ameliorate ToM deficits observed in these patients.
Inglese
http://www.translationalneurodegeneration.com/
Adenzato, M., Manenti, R., Enrici, I., Gobbi, E., Brambilla, M., Alberici, A., Cotelli, M. S., Padovani, A., Borroni, B., Cotelli, M., Transcranial direct current stimulation enhances theory of mind in Parkinson's disease patients with mild cognitive impairment: a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study, <>, 2019; 8 (1): 1-13. [doi:10.1186/s40035-018-0141-9] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/131683]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10807/131683
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