OBJECTIVES: Recurrent glomerulonephritis can negatively affect kidney allograft survival. However, how primary renal disease affects transplant outcomes in the new era of immunosuppression remains unclear. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We categorized 426 kidney transplant recipients (performed from 1996 to 2007) into 4 disease groups: (1) 99 recipients with biopsy-proven immunologically mediated kidney disease, (2) 40 recipients with urologic disease, (3) 67 recipients with polycystic kidney disease, and (4) 220 recipients with other causes of terminal renal failure/uncertain kidney disease. Long-term transplant outcomes were compared between groups at 1, 5, and 10 years of follow-up. RESULTS: Compared with the urologic, polycystic, and other diseases groups, the immunologic group showed significantly lower time of graft survival (9.5 ± 4 vs 8 ± 4 vs 8.5 ± 4 vs 7 ± 4 years, respectively) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (52.5 ± 32 vs 49 ± 22 vs 50 ± 32 vs 35.5 ± 30 mL/min; P < .05). Relative risk of 10-year graft loss for the immunologic group was 2.8 (95% confidence interval, 1.6-4.9). Recurrence rate was 12% in the immunologic group versus 1% and 0% in the other diseases and remaining groups (P < .05). The relative risk of 10-year graft loss for patients with recurrence was 2.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-6.3). Ten-year graft loss rates for patients with biopsy-proven acute rejection, chronic allograft nephropathy, and recurrent glomerulonephritis were 30%, 23%, and 42% (P < .05). For those with biopsy-proven recurrent glomerulonephritis, 10-year estimated glomerular filtration rate was significantly lower than for those with biopsy-proven acute rejection or chronic allograft nephropathy (14 ± 6 vs 18 ± 7 vs 30 ± 10 mL/min; P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: Kidney transplant recipients with immunologically mediated kidney diseases have inferior long-term allograft survival and function versus patients with other causes of renal failure. Recurrence represents the strongest risk factor for premature loss of function and transplant failure.

Favi, E., Pedroso, J. A. R., Salerno, M. P., Spagnoletti, G., Romagnoli, J., Citterio, F., Inferior Long-Term Outcomes for Kidney Transplant Recipients With an Immunologically Mediated Primary Renal Disease, <<EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL TRANSPLANTATION>>, 2017; (Oct 31): N/A-N/A. [doi:10.6002/ect.2017.0025] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/117982]

Inferior Long-Term Outcomes for Kidney Transplant Recipients With an Immunologically Mediated Primary Renal Disease

Favi, Evaldo;Pedroso, José Alberto Rodrigues;Salerno, Maria Paola;Spagnoletti, Gionata;Romagnoli, Jacopo;Citterio, Franco
2017

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Recurrent glomerulonephritis can negatively affect kidney allograft survival. However, how primary renal disease affects transplant outcomes in the new era of immunosuppression remains unclear. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We categorized 426 kidney transplant recipients (performed from 1996 to 2007) into 4 disease groups: (1) 99 recipients with biopsy-proven immunologically mediated kidney disease, (2) 40 recipients with urologic disease, (3) 67 recipients with polycystic kidney disease, and (4) 220 recipients with other causes of terminal renal failure/uncertain kidney disease. Long-term transplant outcomes were compared between groups at 1, 5, and 10 years of follow-up. RESULTS: Compared with the urologic, polycystic, and other diseases groups, the immunologic group showed significantly lower time of graft survival (9.5 ± 4 vs 8 ± 4 vs 8.5 ± 4 vs 7 ± 4 years, respectively) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (52.5 ± 32 vs 49 ± 22 vs 50 ± 32 vs 35.5 ± 30 mL/min; P < .05). Relative risk of 10-year graft loss for the immunologic group was 2.8 (95% confidence interval, 1.6-4.9). Recurrence rate was 12% in the immunologic group versus 1% and 0% in the other diseases and remaining groups (P < .05). The relative risk of 10-year graft loss for patients with recurrence was 2.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-6.3). Ten-year graft loss rates for patients with biopsy-proven acute rejection, chronic allograft nephropathy, and recurrent glomerulonephritis were 30%, 23%, and 42% (P < .05). For those with biopsy-proven recurrent glomerulonephritis, 10-year estimated glomerular filtration rate was significantly lower than for those with biopsy-proven acute rejection or chronic allograft nephropathy (14 ± 6 vs 18 ± 7 vs 30 ± 10 mL/min; P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: Kidney transplant recipients with immunologically mediated kidney diseases have inferior long-term allograft survival and function versus patients with other causes of renal failure. Recurrence represents the strongest risk factor for premature loss of function and transplant failure.
Inglese
Favi, E., Pedroso, J. A. R., Salerno, M. P., Spagnoletti, G., Romagnoli, J., Citterio, F., Inferior Long-Term Outcomes for Kidney Transplant Recipients With an Immunologically Mediated Primary Renal Disease, <>, 2017; (Oct 31): N/A-N/A. [doi:10.6002/ect.2017.0025] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/117982]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10807/117982
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