All definitions of translation describe this process as involving two or more texts running in parallel that are considered to be, in a sense, equivalent to each other. When producing a translation, a source text is divided into syntactic units and each of them is then translated. The translation can be either literal, i.e. it mirrors the structure of the original text very closely, or free, i.e. it ignores the original structure and translates freely. Because languages diverge greatly in their syntax, the structure of a language A can not be fully mapped on a language B, since the outcome in B may be incomprehensible. Besides, cultures differ greatly as to the degree of freedom/literalness tolerated in translation.

Krivoruchko, G. J., Litta, E. M., Pierazzo, E., Translation Studies and XML: Biblical Translations in Byzantine Judaism, a Case Study, Abstract de <<The 20th Joint International Conference of the Association for Literary andLinguistic Computing, and the Association for Computers and the HumanitiesandThe 1st Joint International Conference of the Association for Literary andLinguistic Computing, the Association for Computers and the Humanities,and the Society for Digital Humanities — Société pour l’étude des médiasinteractifs>>, (Oulu, Finland, 24-29 June 2008 ), English Philology University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland 2008: 252-252 [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/99733]

Translation Studies and XML: Biblical Translations in Byzantine Judaism, a Case Study

Litta, Eleonora Maria;
2008

Abstract

All definitions of translation describe this process as involving two or more texts running in parallel that are considered to be, in a sense, equivalent to each other. When producing a translation, a source text is divided into syntactic units and each of them is then translated. The translation can be either literal, i.e. it mirrors the structure of the original text very closely, or free, i.e. it ignores the original structure and translates freely. Because languages diverge greatly in their syntax, the structure of a language A can not be fully mapped on a language B, since the outcome in B may be incomprehensible. Besides, cultures differ greatly as to the degree of freedom/literalness tolerated in translation.
eng
Digital Humanities 2008, University of Oulu, June 24-29, Book of Abstracts
The 20th Joint International Conference of the Association for Literary and Linguistic Computing, and the Association for Computers and the Humanities and The 1st Joint International Conference of the Association for Literary and Linguistic Computing, the Association for Computers and the Humanities, and the Society for Digital Humanities — Société pour l’étude des médias interactifs
Oulu, Finland
24-giu-2008
29-giu-2008
978-951-42-8838-8
English Philology University of Oulu
Krivoruchko, G. J., Litta, E. M., Pierazzo, E., Translation Studies and XML: Biblical Translations in Byzantine Judaism, a Case Study, Abstract de <>, (Oulu, Finland, 24-29 June 2008 ), English Philology University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland 2008: 252-252 [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/99733]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10807/99733
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