The ankylosed spine is prone to fracture even after minor trauma due to its changed biomechanical properties. The two central features of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) that promote the pathological remodeling of the spine are inflammation and new bone formation. AS is also associated with osteoporosis that is attributed to an uncoupling of the bone formation and bone resorption processes. Therefore, bone resorption occurs and promotes weakening of the spine as well as increased risk of vertebral fractures which can be hugely different in terms of clinical relevance. Even in the presence of symptomatic clinical vertebral fractures, the diagnosis can be overruled by attributing the pain to disease activity. Furthermore, given the highly abnormal structure of the spine, vertebral fracture diagnosis can be difficult on the basis of radiography alone. CT can show the fractures in detail. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered the method of choice for the imaging of spinal cord injuries, and a reasonable option for exclusion of occult fractures undetected by CT. Since it is equally important for radiologists and clinicians to have a common knowledge base rather than a compartmentalized view, the aim of this review article was to provide the required clinical knowledge that radiologists need to know and the relevant radiological semiotics that clinicians require in diagnosing clinically significant injury to the ankylosed spine.

Leone, A., Marino, M., Dell'atti, C., Zecchi, V., Magarelli, N., Colosimo, C., Spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis, <<RHEUMATOLOGY INTERNATIONAL>>, 2016; (36(10)): 1335-1346. [doi:10.1007/s00296-016-3524-1] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/93321]

Spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

Leone, Antonio
Primo
;
Marino, Marzia
Secondo
;
Dell'Atti, Claudia;Zecchi, Viola;Magarelli, Nicola
Penultimo
;
Colosimo, Cesare
Ultimo
2016

Abstract

The ankylosed spine is prone to fracture even after minor trauma due to its changed biomechanical properties. The two central features of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) that promote the pathological remodeling of the spine are inflammation and new bone formation. AS is also associated with osteoporosis that is attributed to an uncoupling of the bone formation and bone resorption processes. Therefore, bone resorption occurs and promotes weakening of the spine as well as increased risk of vertebral fractures which can be hugely different in terms of clinical relevance. Even in the presence of symptomatic clinical vertebral fractures, the diagnosis can be overruled by attributing the pain to disease activity. Furthermore, given the highly abnormal structure of the spine, vertebral fracture diagnosis can be difficult on the basis of radiography alone. CT can show the fractures in detail. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered the method of choice for the imaging of spinal cord injuries, and a reasonable option for exclusion of occult fractures undetected by CT. Since it is equally important for radiologists and clinicians to have a common knowledge base rather than a compartmentalized view, the aim of this review article was to provide the required clinical knowledge that radiologists need to know and the relevant radiological semiotics that clinicians require in diagnosing clinically significant injury to the ankylosed spine.
Inglese
Leone, A., Marino, M., Dell'atti, C., Zecchi, V., Magarelli, N., Colosimo, C., Spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis, <<RHEUMATOLOGY INTERNATIONAL>>, 2016; (36(10)): 1335-1346. [doi:10.1007/s00296-016-3524-1] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/93321]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/93321
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