Background Previous studies of vitamin C and kidney stones were conducted mostly in men and either reported disparate results for supplemental and dietary vitamin C or did not examine dietary vitamin C. Study Design Prospective cohort analysis. Setting & Participants 156,735 women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) I and II and 40,536 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS). Predictor Total, dietary, and supplemental vitamin C intake, adjusted for age, body mass index, thiazide use, and dietary factors. Outcomes Incident kidney stones. Results During a median follow-up of 11.3 to 11.7 years, 6,245 incident kidney stones were identified. After multivariable adjustment, total vitamin C intake (<90 [reference], 90-249, 250-499, 500-999, and ≥1,000 mg/d) was not significantly associated with risk for kidney stones among women, but was among men (HRs of 1.00 [reference], 1.19 [95% CI, 0.99-1.46], 1.15 [95% CI, 0.93-1.42], 1.29 [95% CI, 1.04-1.60], and 1.43 [95% CI, 1.15-1.79], respectively; P for trend = 0.005). Median total vitamin C intake for the 500- to 999-mg/d category was ∼700 mg/d. Supplemental vitamin C intake (no use [reference], <500, 500-999, and ≥1,000 mg/d) was not significantly associated with risk for kidney stones among women, but was among men (HR, 1.19 [95% CI, 1.01-1.40] for ≥1,000 mg/d; P for trend = 0.001). Dietary vitamin C intake was not associated with stones among men or women, although few participants had dietary intakes > 700 mg/d. Limitations Nutrient intakes derived from food-frequency questionnaires, lack of data on stone composition for all cases. Conclusions Total and supplemental vitamin C intake was significantly associated with higher risk for incident kidney stones in men, but not in women.

Ferraro, P. M., Curhan, G. C., Gambaro, G., Taylor, E. N., Total, dietary, and supplemental Vitamin C intake and risk of incident kidney stones, <<AMERICAN JOURNAL OF KIDNEY DISEASES>>, 2016; 67 (3): 400-407. [doi:10.1053/j.ajkd.2015.09.005] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/93203]

Total, dietary, and supplemental Vitamin C intake and risk of incident kidney stones

Ferraro, Pietro Manuel
Primo
;
Gambaro, Giovanni
Penultimo
;
2016

Abstract

Background Previous studies of vitamin C and kidney stones were conducted mostly in men and either reported disparate results for supplemental and dietary vitamin C or did not examine dietary vitamin C. Study Design Prospective cohort analysis. Setting & Participants 156,735 women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) I and II and 40,536 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS). Predictor Total, dietary, and supplemental vitamin C intake, adjusted for age, body mass index, thiazide use, and dietary factors. Outcomes Incident kidney stones. Results During a median follow-up of 11.3 to 11.7 years, 6,245 incident kidney stones were identified. After multivariable adjustment, total vitamin C intake (<90 [reference], 90-249, 250-499, 500-999, and ≥1,000 mg/d) was not significantly associated with risk for kidney stones among women, but was among men (HRs of 1.00 [reference], 1.19 [95% CI, 0.99-1.46], 1.15 [95% CI, 0.93-1.42], 1.29 [95% CI, 1.04-1.60], and 1.43 [95% CI, 1.15-1.79], respectively; P for trend = 0.005). Median total vitamin C intake for the 500- to 999-mg/d category was ∼700 mg/d. Supplemental vitamin C intake (no use [reference], <500, 500-999, and ≥1,000 mg/d) was not significantly associated with risk for kidney stones among women, but was among men (HR, 1.19 [95% CI, 1.01-1.40] for ≥1,000 mg/d; P for trend = 0.001). Dietary vitamin C intake was not associated with stones among men or women, although few participants had dietary intakes > 700 mg/d. Limitations Nutrient intakes derived from food-frequency questionnaires, lack of data on stone composition for all cases. Conclusions Total and supplemental vitamin C intake was significantly associated with higher risk for incident kidney stones in men, but not in women.
Inglese
http://www.elsevier.com/inca/publications/store/6/2/3/2/7/6/index.htt
Ferraro, P. M., Curhan, G. C., Gambaro, G., Taylor, E. N., Total, dietary, and supplemental Vitamin C intake and risk of incident kidney stones, <>, 2016; 67 (3): 400-407. [doi:10.1053/j.ajkd.2015.09.005] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/93203]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10807/93203
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