Today, ageing is as a multi-faceted argument which has social, cultural, economic and clinical implications. By some strange paradox, the results achieved in the medical field – in treatment and care, as well as the widespread improvement of the quality of life – tend to effectively extend the span of life, and particularly of the period of old age, that is looked upon more as a problem rather than an achievement worthy of pride. Indeed, ageing exacerbates an increase in economic, social and relational problems, each connected to an increase in the phenomenon of “chronicity”, all of which we are largely unprepared to face. It is best expressed by the oxymoron old age is a new age. It is a new phase of life, one which brings new problems, even thought for centuries it has only been a marginal reality. The recent notion of disability can help us give serious thought – certainly of a prevailing philosophical nature – not only to old age, but also to what we must do if we are called to assume the responsibility of not censuring this time of life. This holds true even it is immediately clear to us that I would be an error to include old age as such within the context of disability.

Pessina, A., Ageing and Disabilities: Cultural Aspects, in Ageing and Disability, (Roma, 20-22 February 2014), Pontifical Academy for Life, Citta' Del Vaticano 2014: 35-44 [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/65241]

Ageing and Disabilities: Cultural Aspects

Pessina, Adriano
2014

Abstract

Today, ageing is as a multi-faceted argument which has social, cultural, economic and clinical implications. By some strange paradox, the results achieved in the medical field – in treatment and care, as well as the widespread improvement of the quality of life – tend to effectively extend the span of life, and particularly of the period of old age, that is looked upon more as a problem rather than an achievement worthy of pride. Indeed, ageing exacerbates an increase in economic, social and relational problems, each connected to an increase in the phenomenon of “chronicity”, all of which we are largely unprepared to face. It is best expressed by the oxymoron old age is a new age. It is a new phase of life, one which brings new problems, even thought for centuries it has only been a marginal reality. The recent notion of disability can help us give serious thought – certainly of a prevailing philosophical nature – not only to old age, but also to what we must do if we are called to assume the responsibility of not censuring this time of life. This holds true even it is immediately clear to us that I would be an error to include old age as such within the context of disability.
Inglese
Ageing and Disability
Ageing and Disability. XX General Assembly of Members 2014
Roma
20-feb-2014
22-feb-2014
9788897830337
Pontifical Academy for Life
Pessina, A., Ageing and Disabilities: Cultural Aspects, in Ageing and Disability, (Roma, 20-22 February 2014), Pontifical Academy for Life, Citta' Del Vaticano 2014: 35-44 [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/65241]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10807/65241
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