Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common causes of cancer deaths, and GC treatments represent a large area of research. Although initially regarded as a sterile organ and unsuitable for microbial communities, the discovery of Helicobacter pylori made us realize that some microbes can colonize the stomach. In recent years, growing interest in gastric bacteria has expanded to the gut microbiota and, more recently, to the oral microbiota. Indeed, the oral-gastric-gut microbiota axis may play a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis, while changes in microbiota composition in GC patients can influence clinical outcomes. On the one hand, the microbiota and its metabolites may significantly influence the progression of GC, while anti-GC treatments such as gastrectomy and chemotherapy may significantly impact the oral-gastric-gut microbiota axis of GC patients. In this context, the role of nutritional therapies, including diet, prebiotics, and probiotics, in treating GC should not be underestimated. Wit this review, we aim to highlight the main role of the gastric, oral, and gut microbiota in GC onset and progression, representing potential future biomarkers for early GC detection and a target for efficient nutritional therapies during the course of GC.

Raoul, P. C., Maccauro, V., Cintoni, M., Scarpellini, E., Ianiro, G., Gasbarrini, A., Mele, M. C., Rinninella, E., Microbiota–Gastric Cancer Interactions and the Potential Influence of Nutritional Therapies, <<INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES>>, 2024; 25 (3): N/A-N/A. [doi:10.3390/ijms25031679] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/277656]

Microbiota–Gastric Cancer Interactions and the Potential Influence of Nutritional Therapies

Raoul, Pauline Celine
Primo
;
Maccauro, Valeria
;
Cintoni, Marco;Ianiro, Gianluca;Gasbarrini, Antonio;Mele, Maria Cristina;Rinninella, Emanuele
Ultimo
Writing – Review & Editing
2024

Abstract

Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common causes of cancer deaths, and GC treatments represent a large area of research. Although initially regarded as a sterile organ and unsuitable for microbial communities, the discovery of Helicobacter pylori made us realize that some microbes can colonize the stomach. In recent years, growing interest in gastric bacteria has expanded to the gut microbiota and, more recently, to the oral microbiota. Indeed, the oral-gastric-gut microbiota axis may play a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis, while changes in microbiota composition in GC patients can influence clinical outcomes. On the one hand, the microbiota and its metabolites may significantly influence the progression of GC, while anti-GC treatments such as gastrectomy and chemotherapy may significantly impact the oral-gastric-gut microbiota axis of GC patients. In this context, the role of nutritional therapies, including diet, prebiotics, and probiotics, in treating GC should not be underestimated. Wit this review, we aim to highlight the main role of the gastric, oral, and gut microbiota in GC onset and progression, representing potential future biomarkers for early GC detection and a target for efficient nutritional therapies during the course of GC.
2024
Inglese
Raoul, P. C., Maccauro, V., Cintoni, M., Scarpellini, E., Ianiro, G., Gasbarrini, A., Mele, M. C., Rinninella, E., Microbiota–Gastric Cancer Interactions and the Potential Influence of Nutritional Therapies, <<INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES>>, 2024; 25 (3): N/A-N/A. [doi:10.3390/ijms25031679] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/277656]
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