Fifty-three pediatric patients given an allogeneic or an autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT) were immunized with a polyvalent pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine (Pneumovax II). Vaccine was administered six months or more after BMT and the pneumococcal IgM, total IgG, and IgG subclasses levels were evaluated before and three weeks after immunization. Immunization promoted a significant rise in antibody serum levels (P < 0.000001), and all children vaccinated more than two years after transplantation responded to pneumococcal polysaccharides, whereas only 20-30% and 50% of patients given BMT between six months and one year and one and two years, respectively, mounted an effective antibody production (P < 0.0001). In univariate analysis, lapse of time from BMT to vaccination, chronic graft-versus-host disease occurrence, and female sex influenced the response rate. However, in multivariate analysis, only time between marrow transplant and immunization was a powerful predictor of response, Interestingly, four of 11 patients with IgG2 deficiency before immunization normalized serum levels of this IgG subclass after the pneumococcal antigenic challenge. Our study suggests that time after transplant is the major factor influencing the recovery of immune reactivity to polysaccharide antigens. This seems to confirm the hypothesis that ontogeny of the B-cell repertoire follows a predetermined sequential program in which polysaccharide antigens are some of the last to evoke an antibody response.

Avanzini, M. A., Carra, A. M., Maccario, R., Zecca, M., Pignatti, P., Marconi, M., Comoli, P., Bonetti, F., De Stefano, P., Locatelli, F., Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in children receiving bone marrow transplantation, <<JOURNAL OF CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY>>, 1995; 15 (3): 137-144. [doi:10.1007/BF01543105] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/269951]

Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in children receiving bone marrow transplantation

Locatelli, Franco
1995

Abstract

Fifty-three pediatric patients given an allogeneic or an autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT) were immunized with a polyvalent pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine (Pneumovax II). Vaccine was administered six months or more after BMT and the pneumococcal IgM, total IgG, and IgG subclasses levels were evaluated before and three weeks after immunization. Immunization promoted a significant rise in antibody serum levels (P < 0.000001), and all children vaccinated more than two years after transplantation responded to pneumococcal polysaccharides, whereas only 20-30% and 50% of patients given BMT between six months and one year and one and two years, respectively, mounted an effective antibody production (P < 0.0001). In univariate analysis, lapse of time from BMT to vaccination, chronic graft-versus-host disease occurrence, and female sex influenced the response rate. However, in multivariate analysis, only time between marrow transplant and immunization was a powerful predictor of response, Interestingly, four of 11 patients with IgG2 deficiency before immunization normalized serum levels of this IgG subclass after the pneumococcal antigenic challenge. Our study suggests that time after transplant is the major factor influencing the recovery of immune reactivity to polysaccharide antigens. This seems to confirm the hypothesis that ontogeny of the B-cell repertoire follows a predetermined sequential program in which polysaccharide antigens are some of the last to evoke an antibody response.
1995
Inglese
Avanzini, M. A., Carra, A. M., Maccario, R., Zecca, M., Pignatti, P., Marconi, M., Comoli, P., Bonetti, F., De Stefano, P., Locatelli, F., Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in children receiving bone marrow transplantation, <<JOURNAL OF CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY>>, 1995; 15 (3): 137-144. [doi:10.1007/BF01543105] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/269951]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/269951
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