The intestine is the largest interface between the internal body and the external environment. The intestinal barrier is a dynamic system influenced by the composition of the intestinal microbiome and the activity of intercellular connections, regulated by hormones, dietary components, inflammatory mediators, and the enteric nervous system (ENS). Over the years, it has become increasingly evident that maintaining a stable intestinal barrier is crucial to prevent various potentially harmful substances and pathogens from entering the internal environment. Disruption of the barrier is referred to as 'leaky gut' or leaky gut wall syndrome and seems to be characterized by the release of bacterial metabolites and endotoxins, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), into the circulation. This condition, mainly caused by bacterial infections, oxidative stress, high-fat diet, exposure to alcohol or chronic allergens, and dysbiosis, appear to be highly connected with the development and/or progression of several metabolic and autoimmune systemic diseases, including obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). In this review, starting from a description of the mechanisms that enable barrier homeostasis and analyzing the relationship between this complex ecosystem and various pathological conditions, we explore the role of the gut barrier in driving systemic inflammation, also shedding light on current and future therapeutic interventions.

Di Vincenzo, F., Del Gaudio, A., Petito, V., Lopetuso, L. R., Scaldaferri, F., Gut microbiota, intestinal permeability, and systemic inflammation: a narrative review, <<INTERNAL AND EMERGENCY MEDICINE>>, 2024; 19 (2): 275-293. [doi:10.1007/s11739-023-03374-w] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/268461]

Gut microbiota, intestinal permeability, and systemic inflammation: a narrative review

Di Vincenzo, Federica;Del Gaudio, Angelo;Petito, Valentina;Lopetuso, Loris Riccardo;Scaldaferri, Franco
2024

Abstract

The intestine is the largest interface between the internal body and the external environment. The intestinal barrier is a dynamic system influenced by the composition of the intestinal microbiome and the activity of intercellular connections, regulated by hormones, dietary components, inflammatory mediators, and the enteric nervous system (ENS). Over the years, it has become increasingly evident that maintaining a stable intestinal barrier is crucial to prevent various potentially harmful substances and pathogens from entering the internal environment. Disruption of the barrier is referred to as 'leaky gut' or leaky gut wall syndrome and seems to be characterized by the release of bacterial metabolites and endotoxins, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), into the circulation. This condition, mainly caused by bacterial infections, oxidative stress, high-fat diet, exposure to alcohol or chronic allergens, and dysbiosis, appear to be highly connected with the development and/or progression of several metabolic and autoimmune systemic diseases, including obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). In this review, starting from a description of the mechanisms that enable barrier homeostasis and analyzing the relationship between this complex ecosystem and various pathological conditions, we explore the role of the gut barrier in driving systemic inflammation, also shedding light on current and future therapeutic interventions.
2024
Inglese
Di Vincenzo, F., Del Gaudio, A., Petito, V., Lopetuso, L. R., Scaldaferri, F., Gut microbiota, intestinal permeability, and systemic inflammation: a narrative review, <<INTERNAL AND EMERGENCY MEDICINE>>, 2024; 19 (2): 275-293. [doi:10.1007/s11739-023-03374-w] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/268461]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/268461
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