BackgroundThe transition from in-hospital intravenous administration to subcutaneous therapies to treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can raise some concerns among patients due to the self-administration concerns, the management of potential side effects and the overall worries related to a change of treatment. This study aimed at evaluating patients' opinion about the switch from intravenous to subcutaneous formulations and their knowledge on new available therapeutic options.MethodsWe conducted a survey using a questionnaire prepared by a team of gastroenterologists and nurses working at the IBD unit. It consists of 31 items and has been divided into four sections: descriptive, commitment, knowledge and passage mode opinion. The questions were formulated in Italian and conceived according to daily consultations with patients in everyday practice, without any previous piloting or specific medical literature reference. The survey was administered to consecutive IBD patients in intravenous biological treatment; patients currently or previously treated with subcutaneous therapy were excluded.ResultsFour hundred questionnaires were distributed to participants. As many as 311 patients (77.7%) completed the survey, while the remaining were excluded from the analysis; 155 (49.8%) patients were favorable to switch from intravenous to subcutaneous therapy, while only 78 (25.1%) disagreed. In univariate and multi-variate analysis, the approval rate for home therapy was significantly associated with the distance from the IBD center and work/family/personal commitments. Surprisingly, only a quarter of the IBD patients knew that almost all available therapeutic agents have a subcutaneous administration route. Regarding patients' opinion on the efficacy of subcutaneous administration of biological agents compared to intravenous drugs, 194 (63%) had no definite idea, while 44 (14%) believed that the effectiveness could be reduced.ConclusionThe transition from in-hospital to subcutaneous therapeutic management of biological therapy at home was generally viewed favorably by patients, especially if they have commitments or were residents far from the IBD center.

Napolitano, D., Settanni, C. R., Parisio, L., Orgiana, N., Poscia, A., Schiavoni, E., Turchini, L., Cascio, A. L., Germini, F., Sblendorio, E., Milani, A., Patteril, C., Laterza, L., Lopetuso, L. R., Pugliese, D., Papa, A., Gasbarrini, A., Scaldaferri, F., Transition from intravenous to subcutaneous biological therapies in inflammatory bowel disease: An online survey of patients, <<INDIAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY>>, 2024; 43 (1): 215-225. [doi:10.1007/s12664-023-01500-2] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/268454]

Transition from intravenous to subcutaneous biological therapies in inflammatory bowel disease: An online survey of patients

Napolitano, Daniele;Settanni, Carlo Romano;Poscia, Andrea;Schiavoni, Elisa;Turchini, Laura;Laterza, Lucrezia;Lopetuso, Loris Riccardo;Pugliese, Daniela;Papa, Alfredo;Gasbarrini, Antonio;Scaldaferri, Franco
2024

Abstract

BackgroundThe transition from in-hospital intravenous administration to subcutaneous therapies to treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can raise some concerns among patients due to the self-administration concerns, the management of potential side effects and the overall worries related to a change of treatment. This study aimed at evaluating patients' opinion about the switch from intravenous to subcutaneous formulations and their knowledge on new available therapeutic options.MethodsWe conducted a survey using a questionnaire prepared by a team of gastroenterologists and nurses working at the IBD unit. It consists of 31 items and has been divided into four sections: descriptive, commitment, knowledge and passage mode opinion. The questions were formulated in Italian and conceived according to daily consultations with patients in everyday practice, without any previous piloting or specific medical literature reference. The survey was administered to consecutive IBD patients in intravenous biological treatment; patients currently or previously treated with subcutaneous therapy were excluded.ResultsFour hundred questionnaires were distributed to participants. As many as 311 patients (77.7%) completed the survey, while the remaining were excluded from the analysis; 155 (49.8%) patients were favorable to switch from intravenous to subcutaneous therapy, while only 78 (25.1%) disagreed. In univariate and multi-variate analysis, the approval rate for home therapy was significantly associated with the distance from the IBD center and work/family/personal commitments. Surprisingly, only a quarter of the IBD patients knew that almost all available therapeutic agents have a subcutaneous administration route. Regarding patients' opinion on the efficacy of subcutaneous administration of biological agents compared to intravenous drugs, 194 (63%) had no definite idea, while 44 (14%) believed that the effectiveness could be reduced.ConclusionThe transition from in-hospital to subcutaneous therapeutic management of biological therapy at home was generally viewed favorably by patients, especially if they have commitments or were residents far from the IBD center.
2024
Inglese
Napolitano, D., Settanni, C. R., Parisio, L., Orgiana, N., Poscia, A., Schiavoni, E., Turchini, L., Cascio, A. L., Germini, F., Sblendorio, E., Milani, A., Patteril, C., Laterza, L., Lopetuso, L. R., Pugliese, D., Papa, A., Gasbarrini, A., Scaldaferri, F., Transition from intravenous to subcutaneous biological therapies in inflammatory bowel disease: An online survey of patients, <<INDIAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY>>, 2024; 43 (1): 215-225. [doi:10.1007/s12664-023-01500-2] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/268454]
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/268454
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 1
  • Scopus 2
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 1
social impact