Human-robot interaction requires that competent robot partners have a multiplicity of human characteristics. Can we accept that these competencies extend to the artistic domain, where humans have always expressed their uniqueness as a species? This study investigated whether aesthetic judgments evoked by abstract artworks vary depending on whether the author was believed to be a human or a robot. Adult participants were asked to give beauty (BJ) and liking (LJ) judgments, where BJ reflected artistic competence and LJ a more idiosyncratic, affective facet associated with the stimuli. Aesthetic judgments were made in a blind-baseline condition, devoid of authorship information, and a primed condition, where authorship information (human or robot) was provided. A significant variation was found in LJ and BJ between the blind and primed conditions. The human-authored paintings received a higher liking rating in the primed than the blind and robot conditions; opposite, the robot-authored paintings received a lower beauty rating in the primed than the blind condition. These results suggest a resistance to accepting artificial intelligence in the production of art and highlight the emotional component associated with human art-making. Furthermore, aesthetic judgments were correlated with the attribution of mental states to a human and a robot to evaluate what mental characteristics are most related to aesthetic judgments. Both BJ and LJ of robot-authored art were significantly associated with the mental ability of creativity, thus pinpointing this skill as a marker of human art-making.

Di Dio, C., Ardizzi, M., Schieppati, S. V., Massaro, D., Gilli, G., Gallese, V., Marchetti, A., Art Made by Artificial Intelligence: The Effect of Authorship on Aesthetic Judgments, <<PSYCHOLOGY OF AESTHETICS, CREATIVITY, AND THE ARTS>>, 2023; (N/A): N/A-N/A. [doi:10.1037/aca0000602] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/261554]

Art Made by Artificial Intelligence: The Effect of Authorship on Aesthetic Judgments

Di Dio, Cinzia;Schieppati, Sara Valentina;Massaro, Davide;Gilli, Gabriella;Marchetti, Antonella
2023

Abstract

Human-robot interaction requires that competent robot partners have a multiplicity of human characteristics. Can we accept that these competencies extend to the artistic domain, where humans have always expressed their uniqueness as a species? This study investigated whether aesthetic judgments evoked by abstract artworks vary depending on whether the author was believed to be a human or a robot. Adult participants were asked to give beauty (BJ) and liking (LJ) judgments, where BJ reflected artistic competence and LJ a more idiosyncratic, affective facet associated with the stimuli. Aesthetic judgments were made in a blind-baseline condition, devoid of authorship information, and a primed condition, where authorship information (human or robot) was provided. A significant variation was found in LJ and BJ between the blind and primed conditions. The human-authored paintings received a higher liking rating in the primed than the blind and robot conditions; opposite, the robot-authored paintings received a lower beauty rating in the primed than the blind condition. These results suggest a resistance to accepting artificial intelligence in the production of art and highlight the emotional component associated with human art-making. Furthermore, aesthetic judgments were correlated with the attribution of mental states to a human and a robot to evaluate what mental characteristics are most related to aesthetic judgments. Both BJ and LJ of robot-authored art were significantly associated with the mental ability of creativity, thus pinpointing this skill as a marker of human art-making.
2023
Inglese
Di Dio, C., Ardizzi, M., Schieppati, S. V., Massaro, D., Gilli, G., Gallese, V., Marchetti, A., Art Made by Artificial Intelligence: The Effect of Authorship on Aesthetic Judgments, <<PSYCHOLOGY OF AESTHETICS, CREATIVITY, AND THE ARTS>>, 2023; (N/A): N/A-N/A. [doi:10.1037/aca0000602] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/261554]
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/261554
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 1
social impact