In most NICUs, the choice of the venous access device currently relies upon the operator's experience and preferences. However, considering the high failure rate of vascular devices in the neonatal population, such clinical choice has a critical relevance and should preferably be based on the best available evidence. Though some algorithms have been published over the last 5 years, none of them seems in line with the current scientific evidence. Thus, the GAVePed-which is the pediatric interest group of the most important Italian group on venous access, GAVeCeLT-has developed a national consensus about the choice of the venous access device in the neonatal population. After a systematic review of the available evidence, the panel of the consensus (which included Italian neonatologists specifically experts in this area) has provided structured recommendations answering four sets of questions regarding (1) umbilical venous catheters, (2) peripheral cannulas, (3) epicutaneo-cava catheters, and (4) ultrasound-guided centrally and femorally inserted central catheters. Only statements reaching a complete agreement were included in the final recommendations. All recommendations were also structured as a simple visual algorithm, so as to be easily translated into clinical practice.Conclusion: The goal of the present consensus is to offer a systematic set of recommendations on the choice of the most appropriate vascular access device in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

Barone, G., D'Andrea, V., Ancora, G., Cresi, F., Maggio, L., Capasso, A., Mastroianni, R., Pozzi, N., Rodriguez-Perez, C., Romitti, M. G., Tota, F., Spagnuolo, F., Raimondi, F., Pittiruti, M., The neonatal DAV-expert algorithm: a GAVeCeLT/GAVePed consensus for the choice of the most appropriate venous access in newborns, <<EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS>>, 2023; 182 (8): 3385-3395. [doi:10.1007/s00431-023-04984-4] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/261178]

The neonatal DAV-expert algorithm: a GAVeCeLT/GAVePed consensus for the choice of the most appropriate venous access in newborns

Barone, Giovanni
;
D'Andrea, Vito
;
Maggio, Luca;Pittiruti, Mauro
2023

Abstract

In most NICUs, the choice of the venous access device currently relies upon the operator's experience and preferences. However, considering the high failure rate of vascular devices in the neonatal population, such clinical choice has a critical relevance and should preferably be based on the best available evidence. Though some algorithms have been published over the last 5 years, none of them seems in line with the current scientific evidence. Thus, the GAVePed-which is the pediatric interest group of the most important Italian group on venous access, GAVeCeLT-has developed a national consensus about the choice of the venous access device in the neonatal population. After a systematic review of the available evidence, the panel of the consensus (which included Italian neonatologists specifically experts in this area) has provided structured recommendations answering four sets of questions regarding (1) umbilical venous catheters, (2) peripheral cannulas, (3) epicutaneo-cava catheters, and (4) ultrasound-guided centrally and femorally inserted central catheters. Only statements reaching a complete agreement were included in the final recommendations. All recommendations were also structured as a simple visual algorithm, so as to be easily translated into clinical practice.Conclusion: The goal of the present consensus is to offer a systematic set of recommendations on the choice of the most appropriate vascular access device in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.
2023
Inglese
Barone, G., D'Andrea, V., Ancora, G., Cresi, F., Maggio, L., Capasso, A., Mastroianni, R., Pozzi, N., Rodriguez-Perez, C., Romitti, M. G., Tota, F., Spagnuolo, F., Raimondi, F., Pittiruti, M., The neonatal DAV-expert algorithm: a GAVeCeLT/GAVePed consensus for the choice of the most appropriate venous access in newborns, <<EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS>>, 2023; 182 (8): 3385-3395. [doi:10.1007/s00431-023-04984-4] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/261178]
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/261178
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 2
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 2
social impact