Background: Blood metabolic profiles can be used to assess metabolic disorders and to evaluate the health status of dairy cows. Given that these analyses are time-consuming, expensive, and stressful for the cows, there has been increased interest in Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of milk samples as a rapid, cost-effective alternative for predicting metabolic disturbances. The integration of FTIR data with other layers of information such as genomic and on-farm data (days in milk (DIM) and parity) has been proposed to further enhance the predictive ability of statistical methods. Here, we developed a phenotype prediction approach for a panel of blood metabolites based on a combination of milk FTIR data, on-farm data, and genomic information recorded on 1150 Holstein cows, using BayesB and gradient boosting machine (GBM) models, with tenfold, batch-out and herd-out cross-validation (CV) scenarios. Results: The predictive ability of these approaches was measured by the coefficient of determination (R2). The results show that, compared to the model that includes only FTIR data, integration of both on-farm (DIM and parity) and genomic information with FTIR data improves the R2 for blood metabolites across the three CV scenarios, especially with the herd-out CV: R2 values ranged from 5.9 to 17.8% for BayesB, from 8.2 to 16.9% for GBM with the tenfold random CV, from 3.8 to 13.5% for BayesB and from 8.6 to 17.5% for GBM with the batch-out CV, and from 8.4 to 23.0% for BayesB and from 8.1 to 23.8% for GBM with the herd-out CV. Overall, with the model that includes the three sources of data, GBM was more accurate than BayesB with accuracies across the CV scenarios increasing by 7.1% for energy-related metabolites, 10.7% for liver function/hepatic damage, 9.6% for oxidative stress, 6.1% for inflammation/innate immunity, and 11.4% for mineral indicators. Conclusions: Our results show that, compared to using only milk FTIR data, a model integrating milk FTIR spectra with on-farm and genomic information improves the prediction of blood metabolic traits in Holstein cattle and that GBM is more accurate in predicting blood metabolites than BayesB, especially for the batch-out CV and herd-out CV scenarios.

Mota, L. F. M., Giannuzzi, D., Pegolo, S., Trevisi, E., Ajmone Marsan, P., Cecchinato, A., Integrating on-farm and genomic information improves the predictive ability of milk infrared prediction of blood indicators of metabolic disorders in dairy cows, <<GENETICS SELECTION EVOLUTION>>, 2023; 55 (1): N/A-N/A. [doi:10.1186/s12711-023-00795-1] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/257961]

Integrating on-farm and genomic information improves the predictive ability of milk infrared prediction of blood indicators of metabolic disorders in dairy cows

Trevisi, Erminio;Ajmone Marsan, Paolo;
2023

Abstract

Background: Blood metabolic profiles can be used to assess metabolic disorders and to evaluate the health status of dairy cows. Given that these analyses are time-consuming, expensive, and stressful for the cows, there has been increased interest in Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of milk samples as a rapid, cost-effective alternative for predicting metabolic disturbances. The integration of FTIR data with other layers of information such as genomic and on-farm data (days in milk (DIM) and parity) has been proposed to further enhance the predictive ability of statistical methods. Here, we developed a phenotype prediction approach for a panel of blood metabolites based on a combination of milk FTIR data, on-farm data, and genomic information recorded on 1150 Holstein cows, using BayesB and gradient boosting machine (GBM) models, with tenfold, batch-out and herd-out cross-validation (CV) scenarios. Results: The predictive ability of these approaches was measured by the coefficient of determination (R2). The results show that, compared to the model that includes only FTIR data, integration of both on-farm (DIM and parity) and genomic information with FTIR data improves the R2 for blood metabolites across the three CV scenarios, especially with the herd-out CV: R2 values ranged from 5.9 to 17.8% for BayesB, from 8.2 to 16.9% for GBM with the tenfold random CV, from 3.8 to 13.5% for BayesB and from 8.6 to 17.5% for GBM with the batch-out CV, and from 8.4 to 23.0% for BayesB and from 8.1 to 23.8% for GBM with the herd-out CV. Overall, with the model that includes the three sources of data, GBM was more accurate than BayesB with accuracies across the CV scenarios increasing by 7.1% for energy-related metabolites, 10.7% for liver function/hepatic damage, 9.6% for oxidative stress, 6.1% for inflammation/innate immunity, and 11.4% for mineral indicators. Conclusions: Our results show that, compared to using only milk FTIR data, a model integrating milk FTIR spectra with on-farm and genomic information improves the prediction of blood metabolic traits in Holstein cattle and that GBM is more accurate in predicting blood metabolites than BayesB, especially for the batch-out CV and herd-out CV scenarios.
2023
Inglese
Mota, L. F. M., Giannuzzi, D., Pegolo, S., Trevisi, E., Ajmone Marsan, P., Cecchinato, A., Integrating on-farm and genomic information improves the predictive ability of milk infrared prediction of blood indicators of metabolic disorders in dairy cows, <<GENETICS SELECTION EVOLUTION>>, 2023; 55 (1): N/A-N/A. [doi:10.1186/s12711-023-00795-1] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/257961]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/257961
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