The p53 protein is a transcription factor known as the "guardian of the genome" because of its critical function in preserving genomic integrity. The TP53 gene is mutated in approximately half of all human malignancies, including those of the breast, colon, lung, liver, prostate, bladder, and skin. When DNA damage occurs, the TP53 gene on human chromosome 17 stops the cell cycle. If p53 protein is mutated, the cell cycle is unrestricted and the damaged DNA is replicated, resulting in uncontrolled cell proliferation and cancer tumours. Tumor-associated p53 mutations are usually associated with phenotypes distinct from those caused by the loss of the tumor-suppressing function exerted by wild-type p53protein. Many of these mutant p53 proteins have oncogenic characteristics, and therefore modulate the ability of cancer cells to proliferate, escape apoptosis, invade and metastasize. Because p53 deficiency is so common in human cancer, this protein is an excellent option for cancer treatment. In this review, we will discuss some of the molecular pathways by which mutant p53 proteins might perform their oncogenic activities, as well as prospective treatment methods based on restoring tumor suppressive p53 functions.

Marei, H. E., Althani, A., Afifi, N., Hasan, A., Caceci, T., Pozzoli, G., Morrione, A., Giordano, A., Cenciarelli, C., p53 signaling in cancer progression and therapy, <<CANCER CELL INTERNATIONAL>>, 2021; 21 (1): 703-717. [doi:10.1186/s12935-021-02396-8] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/233388]

p53 signaling in cancer progression and therapy

Pozzoli, Giacomo;
2021

Abstract

The p53 protein is a transcription factor known as the "guardian of the genome" because of its critical function in preserving genomic integrity. The TP53 gene is mutated in approximately half of all human malignancies, including those of the breast, colon, lung, liver, prostate, bladder, and skin. When DNA damage occurs, the TP53 gene on human chromosome 17 stops the cell cycle. If p53 protein is mutated, the cell cycle is unrestricted and the damaged DNA is replicated, resulting in uncontrolled cell proliferation and cancer tumours. Tumor-associated p53 mutations are usually associated with phenotypes distinct from those caused by the loss of the tumor-suppressing function exerted by wild-type p53protein. Many of these mutant p53 proteins have oncogenic characteristics, and therefore modulate the ability of cancer cells to proliferate, escape apoptosis, invade and metastasize. Because p53 deficiency is so common in human cancer, this protein is an excellent option for cancer treatment. In this review, we will discuss some of the molecular pathways by which mutant p53 proteins might perform their oncogenic activities, as well as prospective treatment methods based on restoring tumor suppressive p53 functions.
2021
Inglese
Marei, H. E., Althani, A., Afifi, N., Hasan, A., Caceci, T., Pozzoli, G., Morrione, A., Giordano, A., Cenciarelli, C., p53 signaling in cancer progression and therapy, <<CANCER CELL INTERNATIONAL>>, 2021; 21 (1): 703-717. [doi:10.1186/s12935-021-02396-8] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/233388]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/233388
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