Introduction: Gut microbiota are a complex ecosystem harboring our intestine. They maintain human body equilibrium, while their derangement, namely, “dysbiosis“, has been associated with several gastrointestinal diseases, such as liver steatosis (NAFLD) and liver cirrhosis. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is an example of dysbiosis of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between SIBO and levels of endotoxemia and grade of liver steatosis (LS) and liver fibrosis (LF) in hepatologic patients. Materials and Methods: Consecutive outpatients referred to our hepatology clinic were tested for SIBO by the lactulose breath test (LBT) and peripheral blood levels of endotoxemia; LS grading and LF were assessed by abdominal ultrasound and transient elastography, respectively. Results: Fifty-two consecutive patients (17 with alcohol abuse (4.5 ± 0.8 alcohol units per day), 4 with HCV and 2 with HBV infection, 24 of metabolic origin, 2 of autoimmune origin, and 3 with cholangiopathies; mean age 54.7 ± 8.3 years, 31 F, BMI 24.1 ± 1.1 Kg/m2) and 14 healthy volunteers (HV) (mean age 50.1 ± 4.3 years, 9 F, BMI 23.3 ± 1.1 Kg/m2) were enrolled. SIBO prevalence was significantly higher in cirrhotic (LC) vs. non-cirrhotic (LNC) patients and vs. HV (all, p < 0.05), with a significant positive trend according to Child-Pugh status (all, p < 0.05). SIBO prevalence was not correlated with LS stages (all, p = NS). Consensually, endotoxin levels were significantly higher in LC vs. LNC and vs. HV (all, p < 0.05) and significantly correlated with LF in patients with LC, according to Child-Pugh status (all, p < 0.05). Conclusion: This study shows that SIBO prevalence and relative endotoxin blood levels seem to be significantly associated with the grade of LF vs. LS in LC. SIBO is also present under pre-cirrhotic conditions, but its prevalence seems to correlate with liver disease irreversible derangement.

Scarpellini, E., Abenavoli, L., Cassano, V., Rinninella, E., Sorge, M., Capretti, F., Rasetti, C., Svegliati Baroni, G., Luzza, F., Santori, P., Sciacqua, A., The Apparent Asymmetrical Relationship Between Small Bowel Bacterial Overgrowth, Endotoxemia, and Liver Steatosis and Fibrosis in Cirrhotic and Non-Cirrhotic Patients: A Single-Center Pilot Study, <<FRONTIERS IN MEDICINE>>, 2022; 9 (9): 872428-N/A. [doi:10.3389/fmed.2022.872428] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/232005]

The Apparent Asymmetrical Relationship Between Small Bowel Bacterial Overgrowth, Endotoxemia, and Liver Steatosis and Fibrosis in Cirrhotic and Non-Cirrhotic Patients: A Single-Center Pilot Study

Rinninella, Emanuele;
2022

Abstract

Introduction: Gut microbiota are a complex ecosystem harboring our intestine. They maintain human body equilibrium, while their derangement, namely, “dysbiosis“, has been associated with several gastrointestinal diseases, such as liver steatosis (NAFLD) and liver cirrhosis. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is an example of dysbiosis of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between SIBO and levels of endotoxemia and grade of liver steatosis (LS) and liver fibrosis (LF) in hepatologic patients. Materials and Methods: Consecutive outpatients referred to our hepatology clinic were tested for SIBO by the lactulose breath test (LBT) and peripheral blood levels of endotoxemia; LS grading and LF were assessed by abdominal ultrasound and transient elastography, respectively. Results: Fifty-two consecutive patients (17 with alcohol abuse (4.5 ± 0.8 alcohol units per day), 4 with HCV and 2 with HBV infection, 24 of metabolic origin, 2 of autoimmune origin, and 3 with cholangiopathies; mean age 54.7 ± 8.3 years, 31 F, BMI 24.1 ± 1.1 Kg/m2) and 14 healthy volunteers (HV) (mean age 50.1 ± 4.3 years, 9 F, BMI 23.3 ± 1.1 Kg/m2) were enrolled. SIBO prevalence was significantly higher in cirrhotic (LC) vs. non-cirrhotic (LNC) patients and vs. HV (all, p < 0.05), with a significant positive trend according to Child-Pugh status (all, p < 0.05). SIBO prevalence was not correlated with LS stages (all, p = NS). Consensually, endotoxin levels were significantly higher in LC vs. LNC and vs. HV (all, p < 0.05) and significantly correlated with LF in patients with LC, according to Child-Pugh status (all, p < 0.05). Conclusion: This study shows that SIBO prevalence and relative endotoxin blood levels seem to be significantly associated with the grade of LF vs. LS in LC. SIBO is also present under pre-cirrhotic conditions, but its prevalence seems to correlate with liver disease irreversible derangement.
2022
Inglese
Scarpellini, E., Abenavoli, L., Cassano, V., Rinninella, E., Sorge, M., Capretti, F., Rasetti, C., Svegliati Baroni, G., Luzza, F., Santori, P., Sciacqua, A., The Apparent Asymmetrical Relationship Between Small Bowel Bacterial Overgrowth, Endotoxemia, and Liver Steatosis and Fibrosis in Cirrhotic and Non-Cirrhotic Patients: A Single-Center Pilot Study, <<FRONTIERS IN MEDICINE>>, 2022; 9 (9): 872428-N/A. [doi:10.3389/fmed.2022.872428] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/232005]
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