Background: Posttraumatic hydrocephalus is a known complication after traumatic brain injury, particularly affecting patients undergoing decompressive craniectomy. Posttraumatic hydrocephalus monitoring in these patients represents a common issue in neurosurgical practice. Patients require periodical assessments by means of computed tomography (CT) scans. This study presents a preliminary institutional series in which ultrasound was used as a bedside imaging technique to monitor ventricular size in patients harboring a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cranioplasty. Exploiting the PEEK cranioplasty permeability to echoes, we evaluated the feasibility of this bedside imaging method in monitoring hydrocephalus evolution, determining effects of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, and excluding complications. Methods: Eight patients with traumatic brain injury harboring PEEK cranioplasty following decompressive craniectomy were prospectively evaluated. Ultrasound measurements were compared with CT scan data taken the same day, and ventricular morphometry parameters were compared. Results: Ultrasound images through the PEEK cranioplasty were of high quality and intracranial anatomy was distinctly evaluated. A strong correlation was observed between ultrasound and CT measurements. Concerning distance between lateral ventricles frontal horns (IFH) and the diameter of the third ventricle (TV), we found a strong correlation between transcranial sonography and CT measurements in preventriculoperitoneal shunt (rho = 0.92 and p = 0.01 for IFH; rho = 0.99 and p = 0.008 for TV) and in postventriculoperitoneal shunt examinations (rho = 0.95 and p = 0.03 for IFH; rho = 0.97 and p = 0.03 for TV). The mean error rate between transcranial sonography and CT scan was 1.77 ± 0.91 mm for preoperative IFH, 0.65 ± 0.27 mm for preoperative TV, 2.18 ± 0.82 mm for postoperative IFH, and 0.48 ± 0.21 mm for postoperative TV. Conclusions: Transcranial ultrasound could represent a simplification of the follow-up and management of ventricular size of patients undergoing PEEK cranioplasty. Even if this is a small series, our preliminary results could widen the potential benefits of PEEK, not only as effective material for cranial reconstruction but also, in selected clinical conditions, as a reliable window to explore intracranial content and to monitor ventricular sizes and shunt functioning.

Signorelli, F., Della Pepa, G. M., Marziali, G., Ioannoni, E., Olivi, A., Caricato, A., Visocchi, M., Montano, N., Bedside Ultrasound for Ventricular Size Monitoring in Patients with PEEK Cranioplasty: A Preliminary Experience of Technical Feasibility in Neurotrauma Setting, <<NEUROCRITICAL CARE>>, 2022; 37 (3): 705-713. [doi:10.1007/s12028-022-01544-w] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/227189]

Bedside Ultrasound for Ventricular Size Monitoring in Patients with PEEK Cranioplasty: A Preliminary Experience of Technical Feasibility in Neurotrauma Setting

Signorelli, Francesco;Della Pepa, Giuseppe Maria;Olivi, Alessandro;Caricato, Anselmo;Visocchi, Massimiliano;Montano, Nicola
2022

Abstract

Background: Posttraumatic hydrocephalus is a known complication after traumatic brain injury, particularly affecting patients undergoing decompressive craniectomy. Posttraumatic hydrocephalus monitoring in these patients represents a common issue in neurosurgical practice. Patients require periodical assessments by means of computed tomography (CT) scans. This study presents a preliminary institutional series in which ultrasound was used as a bedside imaging technique to monitor ventricular size in patients harboring a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cranioplasty. Exploiting the PEEK cranioplasty permeability to echoes, we evaluated the feasibility of this bedside imaging method in monitoring hydrocephalus evolution, determining effects of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, and excluding complications. Methods: Eight patients with traumatic brain injury harboring PEEK cranioplasty following decompressive craniectomy were prospectively evaluated. Ultrasound measurements were compared with CT scan data taken the same day, and ventricular morphometry parameters were compared. Results: Ultrasound images through the PEEK cranioplasty were of high quality and intracranial anatomy was distinctly evaluated. A strong correlation was observed between ultrasound and CT measurements. Concerning distance between lateral ventricles frontal horns (IFH) and the diameter of the third ventricle (TV), we found a strong correlation between transcranial sonography and CT measurements in preventriculoperitoneal shunt (rho = 0.92 and p = 0.01 for IFH; rho = 0.99 and p = 0.008 for TV) and in postventriculoperitoneal shunt examinations (rho = 0.95 and p = 0.03 for IFH; rho = 0.97 and p = 0.03 for TV). The mean error rate between transcranial sonography and CT scan was 1.77 ± 0.91 mm for preoperative IFH, 0.65 ± 0.27 mm for preoperative TV, 2.18 ± 0.82 mm for postoperative IFH, and 0.48 ± 0.21 mm for postoperative TV. Conclusions: Transcranial ultrasound could represent a simplification of the follow-up and management of ventricular size of patients undergoing PEEK cranioplasty. Even if this is a small series, our preliminary results could widen the potential benefits of PEEK, not only as effective material for cranial reconstruction but also, in selected clinical conditions, as a reliable window to explore intracranial content and to monitor ventricular sizes and shunt functioning.
2022
Inglese
Signorelli, F., Della Pepa, G. M., Marziali, G., Ioannoni, E., Olivi, A., Caricato, A., Visocchi, M., Montano, N., Bedside Ultrasound for Ventricular Size Monitoring in Patients with PEEK Cranioplasty: A Preliminary Experience of Technical Feasibility in Neurotrauma Setting, <<NEUROCRITICAL CARE>>, 2022; 37 (3): 705-713. [doi:10.1007/s12028-022-01544-w] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/227189]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/227189
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