Diencephalic syndrome (DS) is a rare pediatric condition associated with optic pathway gliomas (OPGs). Since they are slow-growing tumors, their diagnosis might be delayed, with consequences on long-term outcomes. We present a multicenter case series of nine children with DS associated with OPG, with the aim of providing relevant details about mortality and long-term sequelae. We retrospectively identified nine children (6 M) with DS (median age 14 months, range 3–26 months). Four patients had NF1-related OPGs. Children with NF1 were significantly older than sporadic cases (median (range) age in months: 21.2 (14–26) versus 10 (3–17); p = 0.015). Seven tumors were histologically confirmed as low-grade astrocytomas. All patients received upfront chemotherapy and nutritional support. Although no patient died, all of them experienced tumor progression within 5.67 years since diagnosis and were treated with several lines of chemotherapy and/or surgery. Long-term sequelae included visual, pituitary and neurological dysfunction. Despite an excellent overall survival, PFS rates are poor in OPGs with DS. These patients invariably present visual, neurological or endocrine sequelae. Therefore, functional outcomes and quality-of-life measures should be considered in prospective trials involving patients with OPGs, aiming to identify “high-risk” patients and to better individualize treatment.

De Martino, L., Picariello, S., Triarico, S., Improda, N., Spennato, P., Capozza, M. A., Grandone, A., Santoro, C., Cioffi, D., Attina, G., Cinalli, G., Ruggiero, A., Quaglietta, L., Diencephalic Syndrome Due to Optic Pathway Gliomas in Pediatric Patients: An Italian Multicenter Study, <<DIAGNOSTICS>>, 2022; 12 (3): 1-11. [doi:10.3390/diagnostics12030664] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/223523]

Diencephalic Syndrome Due to Optic Pathway Gliomas in Pediatric Patients: An Italian Multicenter Study

Ruggiero, Antonio;
2022

Abstract

Diencephalic syndrome (DS) is a rare pediatric condition associated with optic pathway gliomas (OPGs). Since they are slow-growing tumors, their diagnosis might be delayed, with consequences on long-term outcomes. We present a multicenter case series of nine children with DS associated with OPG, with the aim of providing relevant details about mortality and long-term sequelae. We retrospectively identified nine children (6 M) with DS (median age 14 months, range 3–26 months). Four patients had NF1-related OPGs. Children with NF1 were significantly older than sporadic cases (median (range) age in months: 21.2 (14–26) versus 10 (3–17); p = 0.015). Seven tumors were histologically confirmed as low-grade astrocytomas. All patients received upfront chemotherapy and nutritional support. Although no patient died, all of them experienced tumor progression within 5.67 years since diagnosis and were treated with several lines of chemotherapy and/or surgery. Long-term sequelae included visual, pituitary and neurological dysfunction. Despite an excellent overall survival, PFS rates are poor in OPGs with DS. These patients invariably present visual, neurological or endocrine sequelae. Therefore, functional outcomes and quality-of-life measures should be considered in prospective trials involving patients with OPGs, aiming to identify “high-risk” patients and to better individualize treatment.
Inglese
De Martino, L., Picariello, S., Triarico, S., Improda, N., Spennato, P., Capozza, M. A., Grandone, A., Santoro, C., Cioffi, D., Attina, G., Cinalli, G., Ruggiero, A., Quaglietta, L., Diencephalic Syndrome Due to Optic Pathway Gliomas in Pediatric Patients: An Italian Multicenter Study, <<DIAGNOSTICS>>, 2022; 12 (3): 1-11. [doi:10.3390/diagnostics12030664] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/223523]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/223523
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