A case-control study including 446 workers reporting headaches (cases; 136 males and 310 females, mean age 46.71 ± 10.84 years) and 446 age- and sex-matched colleagues without headaches (controls; mean age 45.44 ± 10.13) was conducted in the second half of 2020 in a sample drawn from socio health and commercial services companies to investigate the association of headache with lifestyle, metabolic, and work-related factors. Workers suffering from headache reported higher body weight (OR: 1.92, 95% CI: 1.46-2.53, p < 0.001), higher blood cholesterol (OR: 2.01, 95% CI: 1.46-2.77, p < 0.001), triglyceride (OR: 2.01, 95% CI: 1.20-3.35, p < 0.01), blood glucose (OR: 1.91, 95% CI: 1.16-3.24, p < 0.01), and blood pressure levels (OR: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.23-2.52, p < 0.01). In the year preceding the survey, cases had experienced a higher frequency of workplace violence (OR: 2.29, 95% CI: 1.25-4.20, p < 0.01 for physical aggression, OR: 2.22, 95% CI: 1.45-3.41, p < 0.001 for threat, OR: 2.74, 95% CI: 1.72-4.38, p < 0.001 for harassment) and were more frequently distressed (effort/reward ratio > 1) (OR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.39-2.40, p < 0.001) than the controls. Compared to the controls, cases also had higher scores on anxiety and depression scales, lower scores on happiness, and lower levels of sleep quality (p < 0.001). The association of headaches with metabolic and mental health problems suggests that monitoring headaches in the workplace could help to identify workers at risk of impairment.

Di Prinzio, R. R., Arnesano, G., Meraglia, I., Magnavita, N., Headache in Workers: A Matched Case-Control Study, <<EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF INVESTIGATION IN HEALTH, PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION.>>, 2022; 12 (12): 1852-1866. [doi:10.3390/ejihpe12120130] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/222324]

Headache in Workers: A Matched Case-Control Study

Di Prinzio, Reparata Rosa;Arnesano, Gabriele;Meraglia, Igor;Magnavita, Nicola
2022

Abstract

A case-control study including 446 workers reporting headaches (cases; 136 males and 310 females, mean age 46.71 ± 10.84 years) and 446 age- and sex-matched colleagues without headaches (controls; mean age 45.44 ± 10.13) was conducted in the second half of 2020 in a sample drawn from socio health and commercial services companies to investigate the association of headache with lifestyle, metabolic, and work-related factors. Workers suffering from headache reported higher body weight (OR: 1.92, 95% CI: 1.46-2.53, p < 0.001), higher blood cholesterol (OR: 2.01, 95% CI: 1.46-2.77, p < 0.001), triglyceride (OR: 2.01, 95% CI: 1.20-3.35, p < 0.01), blood glucose (OR: 1.91, 95% CI: 1.16-3.24, p < 0.01), and blood pressure levels (OR: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.23-2.52, p < 0.01). In the year preceding the survey, cases had experienced a higher frequency of workplace violence (OR: 2.29, 95% CI: 1.25-4.20, p < 0.01 for physical aggression, OR: 2.22, 95% CI: 1.45-3.41, p < 0.001 for threat, OR: 2.74, 95% CI: 1.72-4.38, p < 0.001 for harassment) and were more frequently distressed (effort/reward ratio > 1) (OR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.39-2.40, p < 0.001) than the controls. Compared to the controls, cases also had higher scores on anxiety and depression scales, lower scores on happiness, and lower levels of sleep quality (p < 0.001). The association of headaches with metabolic and mental health problems suggests that monitoring headaches in the workplace could help to identify workers at risk of impairment.
Inglese
Di Prinzio, R. R., Arnesano, G., Meraglia, I., Magnavita, N., Headache in Workers: A Matched Case-Control Study, <<EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF INVESTIGATION IN HEALTH, PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION.>>, 2022; 12 (12): 1852-1866. [doi:10.3390/ejihpe12120130] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/222324]
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