Background Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) include various sporadic and hereditary neurodegenerative disorders, characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of lower limbs, possibly associated to additional features. Case presentation We report a male HPS patient in his 40 s, showing mental retardation associated with language impairment, dysarthria, and increased urinary frequency. Three months after treatment with electric chronic high-frequency cervical spinal cord stimulation (HF-SCS), he showed an amelioration of motor symptoms (lower limbs spasticity and gait), dysarthria, cognitive functioning (language and constructive praxic abilities), and urinary symptoms (decreased urinary frequency). Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) showed a postoperative increase of cerebral perfusion in right frontal cortex and temporal cortex bilaterally. Conclusion In our patient, HF-SCS might have induced an activation of ascending neural pathways, resulting in changes in activity in various cortical areas (including sensory-motor cortical areas), which may give rise to a modulation of activity in spared descending motor pathways and in neural networks involved in cognitive functions, including language. Although further studies in patients with HPS are needed to clarify whether HF-SCS can be a suitable treatment option in HSP, our observation suggests that HF-SCS, a minimally invasive neurosurgical procedure, might induce beneficial effects of on various symptoms of such orphan disease.

Tufo, T., Ciavarro, M., Di Giuda, D., Piccininni, C., Piano, C., Daniele, A., Spinal cord stimulation may improve gait and cognition in hereditary spastic paraplegia with mental retardation: a case report, <<NEUROLOGICAL SCIENCES>>, 11; (2022): N/A-N/A. [doi:10.1007/s10072-022-06487-w] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/220324]

Spinal cord stimulation may improve gait and cognition in hereditary spastic paraplegia with mental retardation: a case report

Tufo, Tommaso;Di Giuda, Daniela;Piccininni, Chiara;Piano, Carla;Daniele, Antonio
2022

Abstract

Background Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) include various sporadic and hereditary neurodegenerative disorders, characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of lower limbs, possibly associated to additional features. Case presentation We report a male HPS patient in his 40 s, showing mental retardation associated with language impairment, dysarthria, and increased urinary frequency. Three months after treatment with electric chronic high-frequency cervical spinal cord stimulation (HF-SCS), he showed an amelioration of motor symptoms (lower limbs spasticity and gait), dysarthria, cognitive functioning (language and constructive praxic abilities), and urinary symptoms (decreased urinary frequency). Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) showed a postoperative increase of cerebral perfusion in right frontal cortex and temporal cortex bilaterally. Conclusion In our patient, HF-SCS might have induced an activation of ascending neural pathways, resulting in changes in activity in various cortical areas (including sensory-motor cortical areas), which may give rise to a modulation of activity in spared descending motor pathways and in neural networks involved in cognitive functions, including language. Although further studies in patients with HPS are needed to clarify whether HF-SCS can be a suitable treatment option in HSP, our observation suggests that HF-SCS, a minimally invasive neurosurgical procedure, might induce beneficial effects of on various symptoms of such orphan disease.
Inglese
Tufo, T., Ciavarro, M., Di Giuda, D., Piccininni, C., Piano, C., Daniele, A., Spinal cord stimulation may improve gait and cognition in hereditary spastic paraplegia with mental retardation: a case report, <<NEUROLOGICAL SCIENCES>>, 11; (2022): N/A-N/A. [doi:10.1007/s10072-022-06487-w] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/220324]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/220324
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