Since developments are global in the healthcare arena, more should be done to align EU and other big markets' regulatory practices for rare disease patients. Notwithstanding efforts and cooperation between the US and EU aimed to harmonize their strategic plans in the field of orphan drugs, regulatory criteria and procedures to gain the designation, terms and classifications should be still harmonised. Aligning the criteria of prevalence and support to orphan medicines in the various jurisdictions internationally, would facilitate patient recruitment eventually at global level, so as to gain the data and the biological insights required to identify biomarkers and appropriate endpoints needed for progressing clinical development. A conducive regulatory environment can further support the development of medicines to treat rare diseases. Overall there is a need for joined-up regulatory process coordination. Better integration of regulatory pathways and better integration of regulatory systems, such as scientific tools and methods to generate evidence, would be helpful. There is a need to revise and agree the current frameworks to be improved which will take into account the considerations and challenges to diagnose and treat different rare diseases and improve quality of life. Deliberative processes with multi-stakeholders' involvement for reimbursement should be considered. This paper explores the successes and limitation of both the regulation and its implementation mechanisms in the current regulatory context, and suggests some improvements that could maximise its benefits and boost rare disease research even further.

Denis Horgan, 1., Barbara Moss, 2. 3., Stefania Boccia, 4. 5., Genuardi, M., Maciej Gajewski, 8., Gabriele Capurso, 9., Pierre Fenaux 10, 1., Beatrice Gulbis 11, 1., Mariangela Pellegrini 11, 1., Maria Del Mar Mañú Pereira 11, 1., Victoria Gutiérrez Valle 11, 1., Iñaki Gutiérrez Ibarluzea 15, 1., Alastair Kent, 1., Ivana Cattaneo, 1., Beata Jagielska, 1., Ivica Belina, 2., Birute Tumiene, 2., Adrian Ward, 2., Marisa Papaluca, 2., Time for Change? The Why, What and How of Promoting Innovation to Tackle Rare Diseases - Is It Time to Update the EU's Orphan Regulation? And if so, What Should be Changed?, <<BIOMEDICINE HUB>>, 2020; 2020 (2): 1-11. [doi:10.1159/000509272] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/219827]

Time for Change? The Why, What and How of Promoting Innovation to Tackle Rare Diseases - Is It Time to Update the EU's Orphan Regulation? And if so, What Should be Changed?

Genuardi, M.;
2020

Abstract

Since developments are global in the healthcare arena, more should be done to align EU and other big markets' regulatory practices for rare disease patients. Notwithstanding efforts and cooperation between the US and EU aimed to harmonize their strategic plans in the field of orphan drugs, regulatory criteria and procedures to gain the designation, terms and classifications should be still harmonised. Aligning the criteria of prevalence and support to orphan medicines in the various jurisdictions internationally, would facilitate patient recruitment eventually at global level, so as to gain the data and the biological insights required to identify biomarkers and appropriate endpoints needed for progressing clinical development. A conducive regulatory environment can further support the development of medicines to treat rare diseases. Overall there is a need for joined-up regulatory process coordination. Better integration of regulatory pathways and better integration of regulatory systems, such as scientific tools and methods to generate evidence, would be helpful. There is a need to revise and agree the current frameworks to be improved which will take into account the considerations and challenges to diagnose and treat different rare diseases and improve quality of life. Deliberative processes with multi-stakeholders' involvement for reimbursement should be considered. This paper explores the successes and limitation of both the regulation and its implementation mechanisms in the current regulatory context, and suggests some improvements that could maximise its benefits and boost rare disease research even further.
Inglese
Denis Horgan, 1., Barbara Moss, 2. 3., Stefania Boccia, 4. 5., Genuardi, M., Maciej Gajewski, 8., Gabriele Capurso, 9., Pierre Fenaux 10, 1., Beatrice Gulbis 11, 1., Mariangela Pellegrini 11, 1., Maria Del Mar Mañú Pereira 11, 1., Victoria Gutiérrez Valle 11, 1., Iñaki Gutiérrez Ibarluzea 15, 1., Alastair Kent, 1., Ivana Cattaneo, 1., Beata Jagielska, 1., Ivica Belina, 2., Birute Tumiene, 2., Adrian Ward, 2., Marisa Papaluca, 2., Time for Change? The Why, What and How of Promoting Innovation to Tackle Rare Diseases - Is It Time to Update the EU's Orphan Regulation? And if so, What Should be Changed?, <<BIOMEDICINE HUB>>, 2020; 2020 (2): 1-11. [doi:10.1159/000509272] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/219827]
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