Background: In 2017 the Italian government introduced compulsory vaccination for Italian school children for ten diseases, in response to an alarmingly decrease in coverage and measles outbreak. A hot social debate arose around the issue of the law. Studies on the opinion of Italians on this topic are rare, so we investigated the socio-cultural profile of Italians about beliefs towards vaccination.Methods: Data were extracted from the Italian section of the European Social Survey (ESS), conducted by the Italian National Institute for Public Policies Analysis during 2017. The main outcome assessed was the opinion about the supposed harmfulness of vaccines. We analysed the association between the outcome and a selected group of socio-cultural characteristics, with a specific interest in examining the interaction between our main outcome and the perceived trust in the scientific community in regards to vaccines. A principal component analysis was then performed for determining the socio-cultural profile of respondents.Results: Among the 2,626 subjects interviewed face to face, 19% believed that vaccines were harmful and 10% did not have trust in the scientific community in regards to vaccines. Out of the respondents who believed in the harmfulness of vaccines, 29% neither had trust in the scientific community. Principal Component Analysis suggested that this group (Anti-vax/science sceptic) was characterised by low participation in political and cultural life, being male, older of age and politically oriented towards the right. People agreeing about harmfulness of vaccines are mostly males, have a lower education level, poor attendance in political and cultural life and are politically oriented to the right.Conclusions: The ESS survey is unique in its capacity to deal with emerging themes of the social debates. Results paint a picture of the opinions of Italians on vaccines. This profile may be useful for policymakers to design targeted vaccination campaigns and to intervene more efficaciously in the public debate. (C) 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Cadeddu, C., Daugbjerg, S., Ricciardi, W., Rosano, A., Beliefs towards vaccination and trust in the scientific community in Italy, <<VACCINE>>, 2020; 38 (42): 6609-6617. [doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.07.076] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/214352]

Beliefs towards vaccination and trust in the scientific community in Italy

Cadeddu, Chiara
;
Daugbjerg, Signe;Ricciardi, Walter;Rosano, Aldo
2020

Abstract

Background: In 2017 the Italian government introduced compulsory vaccination for Italian school children for ten diseases, in response to an alarmingly decrease in coverage and measles outbreak. A hot social debate arose around the issue of the law. Studies on the opinion of Italians on this topic are rare, so we investigated the socio-cultural profile of Italians about beliefs towards vaccination.Methods: Data were extracted from the Italian section of the European Social Survey (ESS), conducted by the Italian National Institute for Public Policies Analysis during 2017. The main outcome assessed was the opinion about the supposed harmfulness of vaccines. We analysed the association between the outcome and a selected group of socio-cultural characteristics, with a specific interest in examining the interaction between our main outcome and the perceived trust in the scientific community in regards to vaccines. A principal component analysis was then performed for determining the socio-cultural profile of respondents.Results: Among the 2,626 subjects interviewed face to face, 19% believed that vaccines were harmful and 10% did not have trust in the scientific community in regards to vaccines. Out of the respondents who believed in the harmfulness of vaccines, 29% neither had trust in the scientific community. Principal Component Analysis suggested that this group (Anti-vax/science sceptic) was characterised by low participation in political and cultural life, being male, older of age and politically oriented towards the right. People agreeing about harmfulness of vaccines are mostly males, have a lower education level, poor attendance in political and cultural life and are politically oriented to the right.Conclusions: The ESS survey is unique in its capacity to deal with emerging themes of the social debates. Results paint a picture of the opinions of Italians on vaccines. This profile may be useful for policymakers to design targeted vaccination campaigns and to intervene more efficaciously in the public debate. (C) 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Inglese
Cadeddu, C., Daugbjerg, S., Ricciardi, W., Rosano, A., Beliefs towards vaccination and trust in the scientific community in Italy, <<VACCINE>>, 2020; 38 (42): 6609-6617. [doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.07.076] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/214352]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10807/214352
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