Phomopsis cane and leaf spot (PCLS), known in Europe as “excoriose,” is an important fungal disease of grapevines caused by Diaporthe spp., and most often by Diaporthe ampelina (synonym Phomopsis viticola). PCLS is re-emerging worldwide, likely due to climate change, changes in the management of downy mildew from calendar- to risk-based criteria that eliminate early-season (unnecessary) sprays, and the progressive reduction in the application of broad-spectrum fungicides. In this study, a mechanistic model for D. ampelina infection was developed based on published information. The model accounts for the following processes: (i) overwintering and maturation of pycnidia on affected canes; (ii) dispersal of alpha conidia to shoots and leaves; (iii) infection; and (iv) onset of disease symptoms. The model uses weather and host phenology to predict infection periods and disease progress during the season. Model output was validated against 11 independent PCLS epidemics that occurred in Italy (4 vineyards in 2019 and 2020) and Montenegro (3 vineyards in 2020). The model accurately predicted PCLS disease progress, with a concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) = 0.925 between observed and predicted data. A ROC analysis (AUROC>0.7) confirmed the ability of the model to predict the infection periods leading to an increase in PCLS severity in the field, indicating that growers could use the model to perform risk-based fungicide applications.

Gonzalez-dominguez, E., Caffi, T., Paolini, A., Mugnai, L., Latinovic, N., Latinovic, J., Languasco, L., Rossi, V., Development and Validation of a Mechanistic Model That Predicts Infection by Diaporthe ampelina, the Causal Agent of Phomopsis Cane and Leaf Spot of Grapevines, <<FRONTIERS IN PLANT SCIENCE>>, 2022; 13 (N/A): 872333-872333. [doi:10.3389/fpls.2022.872333] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/207097]

Development and Validation of a Mechanistic Model That Predicts Infection by Diaporthe ampelina, the Causal Agent of Phomopsis Cane and Leaf Spot of Grapevines

Caffi T.;Languasco L.;Rossi V.
2022

Abstract

Phomopsis cane and leaf spot (PCLS), known in Europe as “excoriose,” is an important fungal disease of grapevines caused by Diaporthe spp., and most often by Diaporthe ampelina (synonym Phomopsis viticola). PCLS is re-emerging worldwide, likely due to climate change, changes in the management of downy mildew from calendar- to risk-based criteria that eliminate early-season (unnecessary) sprays, and the progressive reduction in the application of broad-spectrum fungicides. In this study, a mechanistic model for D. ampelina infection was developed based on published information. The model accounts for the following processes: (i) overwintering and maturation of pycnidia on affected canes; (ii) dispersal of alpha conidia to shoots and leaves; (iii) infection; and (iv) onset of disease symptoms. The model uses weather and host phenology to predict infection periods and disease progress during the season. Model output was validated against 11 independent PCLS epidemics that occurred in Italy (4 vineyards in 2019 and 2020) and Montenegro (3 vineyards in 2020). The model accurately predicted PCLS disease progress, with a concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) = 0.925 between observed and predicted data. A ROC analysis (AUROC>0.7) confirmed the ability of the model to predict the infection periods leading to an increase in PCLS severity in the field, indicating that growers could use the model to perform risk-based fungicide applications.
eng
Gonzalez-dominguez, E., Caffi, T., Paolini, A., Mugnai, L., Latinovic, N., Latinovic, J., Languasco, L., Rossi, V., Development and Validation of a Mechanistic Model That Predicts Infection by Diaporthe ampelina, the Causal Agent of Phomopsis Cane and Leaf Spot of Grapevines, <>, 2022; 13 (N/A): 872333-872333. [doi:10.3389/fpls.2022.872333] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/207097]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10807/207097
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