Impaired physical functioning is one of the most critical consequences associated with fi-bromyalgia, especially when there is comorbid obesity. Psychological factors are known to contribute to perceived (i.e., subjective) physical functioning. However, physical function is a multidimensional concept encompassing both subjective and objective functioning. The contribution of psychological factors to performance-based (i.e., objective) functioning is unclear. This study aims to investigate the contribution of pain catastrophizing and pain acceptance to both self-reported and performance-based physical functioning. In this cross-sectional study, 160 participants completed self-report measures of pain catastrophizing, pain acceptance, and pain severity. A self-report measure and a performance-based test were used to assess physical functioning. Higher pain catastrophizing and lower pain acceptance were associated with poorer physical functioning at both self-reported and performance-based levels. Our results are consistent with previous evidence on the association between pain catastrophizing and pain acceptance with self-reported physical functioning. This study contributes to the current literature by providing novel insights into the role of psychological factors in performance-based physical functioning. Multidisciplinary interventions that address pain catas-trophizing and pain acceptance are recommended and might be effective to improve both perceived and performance-based functioning in women with FM and obesity.

Varallo, G., Scarpina, F., Giusti, E. M., Suso-ribera, C., Cattivelli, R., Guerrini Usubini, A., Capodaglio, P., Castelnuovo, G., The role of pain catastrophizing and pain acceptance in performance-based and self-reported physical functioning in individuals with fibromyalgia and obesity, <<JOURNAL OF PERSONALIZED MEDICINE>>, 2021; 11 (8): 810-N/A. [doi:10.3390/jpm11080810] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/203562]

The role of pain catastrophizing and pain acceptance in performance-based and self-reported physical functioning in individuals with fibromyalgia and obesity

Giusti E. M.;Guerrini Usubini A.;Castelnuovo G.
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

Impaired physical functioning is one of the most critical consequences associated with fi-bromyalgia, especially when there is comorbid obesity. Psychological factors are known to contribute to perceived (i.e., subjective) physical functioning. However, physical function is a multidimensional concept encompassing both subjective and objective functioning. The contribution of psychological factors to performance-based (i.e., objective) functioning is unclear. This study aims to investigate the contribution of pain catastrophizing and pain acceptance to both self-reported and performance-based physical functioning. In this cross-sectional study, 160 participants completed self-report measures of pain catastrophizing, pain acceptance, and pain severity. A self-report measure and a performance-based test were used to assess physical functioning. Higher pain catastrophizing and lower pain acceptance were associated with poorer physical functioning at both self-reported and performance-based levels. Our results are consistent with previous evidence on the association between pain catastrophizing and pain acceptance with self-reported physical functioning. This study contributes to the current literature by providing novel insights into the role of psychological factors in performance-based physical functioning. Multidisciplinary interventions that address pain catas-trophizing and pain acceptance are recommended and might be effective to improve both perceived and performance-based functioning in women with FM and obesity.
Inglese
Varallo, G., Scarpina, F., Giusti, E. M., Suso-ribera, C., Cattivelli, R., Guerrini Usubini, A., Capodaglio, P., Castelnuovo, G., The role of pain catastrophizing and pain acceptance in performance-based and self-reported physical functioning in individuals with fibromyalgia and obesity, <>, 2021; 11 (8): 810-N/A. [doi:10.3390/jpm11080810] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/203562]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10807/203562
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