Up to 50% of the people who have died from COVID-19 had metabolic and vascular disorders. Notably, there are many direct links between COVID-19 and the metabolic and endocrine systems. Thus, not only are patients with metabolic dysfunction (eg, obesity, hypertension, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and diabetes) at an increased risk of developing severe COVID-19 but also infection with SARS-CoV-2 might lead to new-onset diabetes or aggravation of pre-existing metabolic disorders. In this Review, we provide an update on the mechanisms of how metabolic and endocrine disorders might predispose patients to develop severe COVID-19. Additionally, we update the practical recommendations and management of patients with COVID-19 and post-pandemic. Furthermore, we summarise new treatment options for patients with both COVID-19 and diabetes, and highlight current challenges in clinical management.

Steenblock, C., Schwarz, P. E. H., Ludwig, B., Linkermann, A., Zimmet, P., Kulebyakin, K., Tkachuk, V. A., Markov, A. G., Lehnert, H., De Angelis, M. H., Rietzsch, H., Rodionov, R. N., Khunti, K., Hopkins, D., Birkenfeld, A. L., Boehm, B., Holt, R. I. G., Skyler, J. S., Devries, J. H., Renard, E., Eckel, R. H., Alberti, K. G. M. M., Geloneze, B., Chan, J. C., Mbanya, J. C., Onyegbutulem, H. C., Ramachandran, A., Basit, A., Hassanein, M., Bewick, G., Spinas, G. A., Beuschlein, F., Landgraf, R., Rubino, F., Mingrone, G., Bornstein, S. R., COVID-19 and metabolic disease: mechanisms and clinical management, <<THE LANCET DIABETES & ENDOCRINOLOGY>>, 2021; 9 (11): 786-798. [doi:10.1016/S2213-8587(21)00244-8] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/200870]

COVID-19 and metabolic disease: mechanisms and clinical management

Mingrone, Geltrude;
2021

Abstract

Up to 50% of the people who have died from COVID-19 had metabolic and vascular disorders. Notably, there are many direct links between COVID-19 and the metabolic and endocrine systems. Thus, not only are patients with metabolic dysfunction (eg, obesity, hypertension, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and diabetes) at an increased risk of developing severe COVID-19 but also infection with SARS-CoV-2 might lead to new-onset diabetes or aggravation of pre-existing metabolic disorders. In this Review, we provide an update on the mechanisms of how metabolic and endocrine disorders might predispose patients to develop severe COVID-19. Additionally, we update the practical recommendations and management of patients with COVID-19 and post-pandemic. Furthermore, we summarise new treatment options for patients with both COVID-19 and diabetes, and highlight current challenges in clinical management.
2021
Inglese
Steenblock, C., Schwarz, P. E. H., Ludwig, B., Linkermann, A., Zimmet, P., Kulebyakin, K., Tkachuk, V. A., Markov, A. G., Lehnert, H., De Angelis, M. H., Rietzsch, H., Rodionov, R. N., Khunti, K., Hopkins, D., Birkenfeld, A. L., Boehm, B., Holt, R. I. G., Skyler, J. S., Devries, J. H., Renard, E., Eckel, R. H., Alberti, K. G. M. M., Geloneze, B., Chan, J. C., Mbanya, J. C., Onyegbutulem, H. C., Ramachandran, A., Basit, A., Hassanein, M., Bewick, G., Spinas, G. A., Beuschlein, F., Landgraf, R., Rubino, F., Mingrone, G., Bornstein, S. R., COVID-19 and metabolic disease: mechanisms and clinical management, <<THE LANCET DIABETES & ENDOCRINOLOGY>>, 2021; 9 (11): 786-798. [doi:10.1016/S2213-8587(21)00244-8] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/200870]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/200870
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