Background: Nursing homes are among the most common places of death in many countries. Aim: To determine the quality of dying and end-of-life care of nursing home residents in six European countries. Design: Epidemiological survey in a proportionally stratified random sample of nursing homes. We identified all deaths of residents of the preceding 3-month period. Main outcomes: quality of dying in the last week of life (measured using End-of-Life in Dementia Scales – Comfort Assessment while Dying (EOLD-CAD)); quality of end-of-life care in the last month of life (measured using Quality of Dying in Long-Term Care (QoD-LTC) scale). Higher scores indicate better quality. Setting/participants: Three hundred and twenty-two nursing homes in Belgium, Finland, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland and England. Participants were staff (nurses or care assistants) most involved in each resident’s care. Results: Staff returned questionnaires regarding 1384 (81.6%) of 1696 deceased residents. The End-of-Life in Dementia Scales – Comfort Assessment while Dying mean score (95% confidence interval) (theoretical 14–42) ranged from 29.9 (27.6; 32.2) in Italy to 33.9 (31.5; 36.3) in England. The Quality of Dying in Long-Term Care mean score (95% confidence interval) (theoretical 11–55) ranged from 35.0 (31.8; 38.3) in Italy to 44.1 (40.7; 47.4) in England. A higher End-of-Life in Dementia Scales – Comfort Assessment while Dying score was associated with country (p = 0.027), older age (p = 0.012), length of stay ⩾1 year (p = 0.034), higher functional status (p < 0.001). A higher Quality of Dying in Long-Term Care score was associated with country (p < 0.001), older age (p < 0.001), length of stay ⩾1 year (p < 0.001), higher functional status (p = 0.002), absence of dementia (p = 0.001), death in nursing home (p = 0.033). Conclusion: The quality of dying and quality of end-of-life care in nursing homes in the countries studied are not optimal. This includes countries with high levels of palliative care development in nursing homes such as Belgium, the Netherlands and England.

Pivodic, L., Smets, T., Van Den Noortgate, N., Onwuteaka-philipsen, B. D., Engels, Y., Szczerbinska, K., Finne-soveri, H., Froggatt, K., Gambassi, G., Deliens, L., Van Den Block, L., Quality of dying and quality of end-of-life care of nursing home residents in six countries: An epidemiological study, <<PALLIATIVE MEDICINE>>, 2018; 32 (10): 1584-1595. [doi:10.1177/0269216318800610] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/170768]

Quality of dying and quality of end-of-life care of nursing home residents in six countries: An epidemiological study

Gambassi, G.;
2018

Abstract

Background: Nursing homes are among the most common places of death in many countries. Aim: To determine the quality of dying and end-of-life care of nursing home residents in six European countries. Design: Epidemiological survey in a proportionally stratified random sample of nursing homes. We identified all deaths of residents of the preceding 3-month period. Main outcomes: quality of dying in the last week of life (measured using End-of-Life in Dementia Scales – Comfort Assessment while Dying (EOLD-CAD)); quality of end-of-life care in the last month of life (measured using Quality of Dying in Long-Term Care (QoD-LTC) scale). Higher scores indicate better quality. Setting/participants: Three hundred and twenty-two nursing homes in Belgium, Finland, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland and England. Participants were staff (nurses or care assistants) most involved in each resident’s care. Results: Staff returned questionnaires regarding 1384 (81.6%) of 1696 deceased residents. The End-of-Life in Dementia Scales – Comfort Assessment while Dying mean score (95% confidence interval) (theoretical 14–42) ranged from 29.9 (27.6; 32.2) in Italy to 33.9 (31.5; 36.3) in England. The Quality of Dying in Long-Term Care mean score (95% confidence interval) (theoretical 11–55) ranged from 35.0 (31.8; 38.3) in Italy to 44.1 (40.7; 47.4) in England. A higher End-of-Life in Dementia Scales – Comfort Assessment while Dying score was associated with country (p = 0.027), older age (p = 0.012), length of stay ⩾1 year (p = 0.034), higher functional status (p < 0.001). A higher Quality of Dying in Long-Term Care score was associated with country (p < 0.001), older age (p < 0.001), length of stay ⩾1 year (p < 0.001), higher functional status (p = 0.002), absence of dementia (p = 0.001), death in nursing home (p = 0.033). Conclusion: The quality of dying and quality of end-of-life care in nursing homes in the countries studied are not optimal. This includes countries with high levels of palliative care development in nursing homes such as Belgium, the Netherlands and England.
Inglese
Pivodic, L., Smets, T., Van Den Noortgate, N., Onwuteaka-philipsen, B. D., Engels, Y., Szczerbinska, K., Finne-soveri, H., Froggatt, K., Gambassi, G., Deliens, L., Van Den Block, L., Quality of dying and quality of end-of-life care of nursing home residents in six countries: An epidemiological study, <<PALLIATIVE MEDICINE>>, 2018; 32 (10): 1584-1595. [doi:10.1177/0269216318800610] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/170768]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/170768
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