Abstract OBJECTIVE: It has been suggested that vitamin D may play a role in the pathogenesis of several endocrine diseases, such as hyperparathyroidism, type 1 diabetes (T1DM), type 2 diabetes (T2DM), autoimmune thyroid diseases, Addison's disease and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In this review, we debate the role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of endocrine diseases. METHODS: Narrative overview of the literature synthesizing the current evidence retrieved from searches of computerized databases, hand searches and authoritative texts. RESULTS: Evidence from basic science supports a role for vitamin D in many endocrine conditions. In humans, inverse relationships have been reported not only between blood 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone concentrations but also with risk of T1DM, T2DM, and PCOS. There is less evidence for an association with Addison's disease or autoimmune thyroid disease. Vitamin D supplementation may have a role for prevention of T2DM, but the available evidence is not consistent. CONCLUSIONS: Although observational studies support a potential role of vitamin D in endocrine disease, high quality evidence from clinical trials does not exist to establish a place for vitamin D supplementation in optimizing endocrine health. Ongoing randomized controlled trials are expected to provide insights into the efficacy and safety of vitamin D in the management of endocrine disease. © 2014 European Society of Endocrinology.

Muscogiuri, G., Mitri, J., Mathieu, C., Badenhoop, K., Tamer, G., Orio, F., Mezza, T., Vieth, R., Colao, A., Pittas, A., Mechanisms in endocrinology: vitamin D as a potential contributor in endocrine health and disease., <<EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGY>>, 2014; (171(3)): 101-110. [doi:10.1530/EJE-14-0158] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/147819]

Mechanisms in endocrinology: vitamin D as a potential contributor in endocrine health and disease.

Mezza, T;
2014

Abstract

Abstract OBJECTIVE: It has been suggested that vitamin D may play a role in the pathogenesis of several endocrine diseases, such as hyperparathyroidism, type 1 diabetes (T1DM), type 2 diabetes (T2DM), autoimmune thyroid diseases, Addison's disease and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In this review, we debate the role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of endocrine diseases. METHODS: Narrative overview of the literature synthesizing the current evidence retrieved from searches of computerized databases, hand searches and authoritative texts. RESULTS: Evidence from basic science supports a role for vitamin D in many endocrine conditions. In humans, inverse relationships have been reported not only between blood 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone concentrations but also with risk of T1DM, T2DM, and PCOS. There is less evidence for an association with Addison's disease or autoimmune thyroid disease. Vitamin D supplementation may have a role for prevention of T2DM, but the available evidence is not consistent. CONCLUSIONS: Although observational studies support a potential role of vitamin D in endocrine disease, high quality evidence from clinical trials does not exist to establish a place for vitamin D supplementation in optimizing endocrine health. Ongoing randomized controlled trials are expected to provide insights into the efficacy and safety of vitamin D in the management of endocrine disease. © 2014 European Society of Endocrinology.
Inglese
Muscogiuri, G., Mitri, J., Mathieu, C., Badenhoop, K., Tamer, G., Orio, F., Mezza, T., Vieth, R., Colao, A., Pittas, A., Mechanisms in endocrinology: vitamin D as a potential contributor in endocrine health and disease., <<EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGY>>, 2014; (171(3)): 101-110. [doi:10.1530/EJE-14-0158] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/147819]
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/147819
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 107
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 101
social impact