This study explains the process ‘’how’’ organizational accounting practices, such as budgetary participation, influence medical doctors’ perceptions and beliefs associated with their hybrid role and what the consequences are on their performance. Building on social cognitive theory, we hypothesize a structural model in which managerial self-efficacy and role clarity mediate the effects of budgetary participation on performance. The data were collected by a survey conducted in an Italian hospital. The research hypotheses were tested employing a path model. The results suggest that role clarity and managerial self-efficacy fully mediate the link between budgetary participation and performance. From a managerial viewpoint results suggest that organizations that invest in budgetary participation will also affect individual beliefs about the perceived benefits of participation itself, since an information-rich internal environment allows employees to experience a clearer sense of direction through organizational goals. According to our results, organizations that seek self-directed employees should pay attention to the experience the medical managers acquire through budgetary participation. In fact, this event influences the employees’ mental states—and specifically provides them with information needed to perform in the role and enhance their judgment of their own capabilities to organize and execute the required course of actions—which take on internal psychological motivation to reach performance levels.

Macinati, M. S., Cantaluppi, G., Rizzo, M. G., Medical managers’ managerial self-efficacy and role clarity: How do they bridge the budgetary participation–performance link?, <<HEALTH SERVICES MANAGEMENT RESEARCH>>, 2017; 30(1) (1): 47-60. [doi:10.1177/0951484816682398] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/101454]

Medical managers’ managerial self-efficacy and role clarity: How do they bridge the budgetary participation–performance link?

Macinati, Manuela Samantha
Primo
;
Cantaluppi, Gabriele
Secondo
;
Rizzo, Marco Giovanni
Ultimo
2017

Abstract

This study explains the process ‘’how’’ organizational accounting practices, such as budgetary participation, influence medical doctors’ perceptions and beliefs associated with their hybrid role and what the consequences are on their performance. Building on social cognitive theory, we hypothesize a structural model in which managerial self-efficacy and role clarity mediate the effects of budgetary participation on performance. The data were collected by a survey conducted in an Italian hospital. The research hypotheses were tested employing a path model. The results suggest that role clarity and managerial self-efficacy fully mediate the link between budgetary participation and performance. From a managerial viewpoint results suggest that organizations that invest in budgetary participation will also affect individual beliefs about the perceived benefits of participation itself, since an information-rich internal environment allows employees to experience a clearer sense of direction through organizational goals. According to our results, organizations that seek self-directed employees should pay attention to the experience the medical managers acquire through budgetary participation. In fact, this event influences the employees’ mental states—and specifically provides them with information needed to perform in the role and enhance their judgment of their own capabilities to organize and execute the required course of actions—which take on internal psychological motivation to reach performance levels.
Inglese
Macinati, M. S., Cantaluppi, G., Rizzo, M. G., Medical managers’ managerial self-efficacy and role clarity: How do they bridge the budgetary participation–performance link?, <<HEALTH SERVICES MANAGEMENT RESEARCH>>, 2017; 30(1) (1): 47-60. [doi:10.1177/0951484816682398] [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/101454]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10807/101454
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