This analysis of the Italian health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. Italy has a regionalized National Health Service (SSN) that provides universal coverage largely free of charge at the point of delivery, though certain services and goods require a co-payment. Life expectancy in Italy is historically among the highest in the EU. However, regional differences in health indicators are marked, as well as in per capita spending, distribution of health professionals and in the quality of health services. Overall, Italy's health spending per capita is lower than the EU average and is among the lowest in western European countries. Private spending has increased in recent years, although this trend was halted in 2020 during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. A key focus of health policies in recent decades was to promote a shift away from unnecessary inpatient care, with a considerable reduction of acute hospital beds and stagnating overall growth in health personnel. However, this was not counterbalanced by a sufficient strengthening of community services in order to cope with the ageing population's needs and related chronic conditions burden. This had important repercussions during the COVID-19 emergency, as the health system felt the impact of previous reductions in hospital beds and capacity and underinvestment in community-based care. Reorganizing hospital and community care will require a strong alignment between central and regional authorities. The COVID-19 crisis also highlighted several issues pre-dating the pandemic that need to be addressed to improve the sustainability and resilience of the SSN. The main outstanding challenges for the health system are linked to addressing historic underinvestment in the health workforce, modernizing outdated infrastructure and equipment, and enhancing information infrastructure. Italy's National Recovery and Resilience Plan, underwritten by the Next Generation EU budget to assist with economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, contains specific health sector priorities, such as strengthening the country's primary and community care, boosting capital investment and funding the digitalization of the health care system.

De Belvis, A., Meregaglia, M., Morsella, A., Adduci, A., Perilli, A., Cascini, F., Solipaca, A., Fattore, G., Ricciardi, W., Maresso, A., Scarpetti, G., Italy: Health System Review, NLM (Medline), Copenhagen, DENMARK 2022:<<HEALTH SYSTEMS IN TRANSITION>>,24 236 [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/258247]

Italy: Health System Review

De Belvis, Antonio
;
Morsella, Alisha;Adduci, Andrea;Perilli, Alessio;Cascini, Fidelia;Ricciardi, Walter;Scarpetti, Giada
2022

Abstract

This analysis of the Italian health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. Italy has a regionalized National Health Service (SSN) that provides universal coverage largely free of charge at the point of delivery, though certain services and goods require a co-payment. Life expectancy in Italy is historically among the highest in the EU. However, regional differences in health indicators are marked, as well as in per capita spending, distribution of health professionals and in the quality of health services. Overall, Italy's health spending per capita is lower than the EU average and is among the lowest in western European countries. Private spending has increased in recent years, although this trend was halted in 2020 during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. A key focus of health policies in recent decades was to promote a shift away from unnecessary inpatient care, with a considerable reduction of acute hospital beds and stagnating overall growth in health personnel. However, this was not counterbalanced by a sufficient strengthening of community services in order to cope with the ageing population's needs and related chronic conditions burden. This had important repercussions during the COVID-19 emergency, as the health system felt the impact of previous reductions in hospital beds and capacity and underinvestment in community-based care. Reorganizing hospital and community care will require a strong alignment between central and regional authorities. The COVID-19 crisis also highlighted several issues pre-dating the pandemic that need to be addressed to improve the sustainability and resilience of the SSN. The main outstanding challenges for the health system are linked to addressing historic underinvestment in the health workforce, modernizing outdated infrastructure and equipment, and enhancing information infrastructure. Italy's National Recovery and Resilience Plan, underwritten by the Next Generation EU budget to assist with economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, contains specific health sector priorities, such as strengthening the country's primary and community care, boosting capital investment and funding the digitalization of the health care system.
2022
Inglese
Monografia o trattato scientifico
NLM (Medline)
De Belvis, A., Meregaglia, M., Morsella, A., Adduci, A., Perilli, A., Cascini, F., Solipaca, A., Fattore, G., Ricciardi, W., Maresso, A., Scarpetti, G., Italy: Health System Review, NLM (Medline), Copenhagen, DENMARK 2022:<<HEALTH SYSTEMS IN TRANSITION>>,24 236 [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/258247]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/258247
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