in this special issue, several thematic areas were highlighted including but not limited to: (a) Knowledge, attitude and practices to COVID-19 and its preventive measures— for example, Purnama et al. noted the continued practice of stay at home, physical distancing, and always using face masks for the public to have a supportive attitude, and Albaqawi et al. revealed good perceptions of COVID-19 knowledge and its prevention among Saudi Arabia nursing students, and positive perceptions on the government’s effort in responding to the COVID-19 crisis. (b) Policy interventions to fight COVID-19 pandemic such as pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical strategies— for example, Giudici and Raffinetti suggested Gini- Lorenz concentration approach to monitor COVID-19 policy interventions and Goldman’s demonstrated Voluntary Cyclical Distancing as alternative approach to social distancing. (c) Impacts of COVID-19 and its preventive measures such as increased alcohol consumption, mental illness, unintended breast cancer, human rights violations, and stigma and discrimination, and diminishing quality of life— for example, Septarini et al. reported moderate to very high psychological distress and lack of happiness during the COVID-19 pandemic among MSM in Indonesia, Lunnay et al. depicted increasing in alcohol consumption among Australian women in the emerging affluent group who experienced increased feelings or fear and anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic, and Santos et al.’s demonstrated collision of fundamental human rights and the right to health access as a result of the preventive measures. (d) Media and COVID-19 pandemic especially on the role of media on framing political consequences and responsibility— for example, Jo et al.’s reported media’s framing on quarantine performance in South Korea bringing a positive change in people’s attitudes toward the government and Thomas et al.’s added media’s lack of blame of COVID-19 pandemic in Australia. (f) Others including Trust during and post-COVID-19 pandemic such as strategies to maintain public trust,

Ward, P. R., Bissell, P., Meyer, S. B., Gesesew, H. A., Januraga, P. P., Chang, D., Lombi, L. (eds.), COVID-19-Social Science Research During a Pandemic, <<FRONTIERS IN PUBLIC HEALTH>>, 2022; 2022: (10): 652 [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/212911]

COVID-19-Social Science Research During a Pandemic

Lombi, L.
2022

Abstract

in this special issue, several thematic areas were highlighted including but not limited to: (a) Knowledge, attitude and practices to COVID-19 and its preventive measures— for example, Purnama et al. noted the continued practice of stay at home, physical distancing, and always using face masks for the public to have a supportive attitude, and Albaqawi et al. revealed good perceptions of COVID-19 knowledge and its prevention among Saudi Arabia nursing students, and positive perceptions on the government’s effort in responding to the COVID-19 crisis. (b) Policy interventions to fight COVID-19 pandemic such as pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical strategies— for example, Giudici and Raffinetti suggested Gini- Lorenz concentration approach to monitor COVID-19 policy interventions and Goldman’s demonstrated Voluntary Cyclical Distancing as alternative approach to social distancing. (c) Impacts of COVID-19 and its preventive measures such as increased alcohol consumption, mental illness, unintended breast cancer, human rights violations, and stigma and discrimination, and diminishing quality of life— for example, Septarini et al. reported moderate to very high psychological distress and lack of happiness during the COVID-19 pandemic among MSM in Indonesia, Lunnay et al. depicted increasing in alcohol consumption among Australian women in the emerging affluent group who experienced increased feelings or fear and anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic, and Santos et al.’s demonstrated collision of fundamental human rights and the right to health access as a result of the preventive measures. (d) Media and COVID-19 pandemic especially on the role of media on framing political consequences and responsibility— for example, Jo et al.’s reported media’s framing on quarantine performance in South Korea bringing a positive change in people’s attitudes toward the government and Thomas et al.’s added media’s lack of blame of COVID-19 pandemic in Australia. (f) Others including Trust during and post-COVID-19 pandemic such as strategies to maintain public trust,
Inglese
Ward, P. R., Bissell, P., Meyer, S. B., Gesesew, H. A., Januraga, P. P., Chang, D., Lombi, L. (eds.), COVID-19-Social Science Research During a Pandemic, <<FRONTIERS IN PUBLIC HEALTH>>, 2022; 2022: (10): 652 [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/212911]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/212911
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