An effective and efficient disposal of assets confiscated from criminals is crucial to ensure that confiscation policies reach their expected objectives. If any problems arise in the last phase of confiscation proceedings, the efforts made by the criminal justice system in tracing, seizing and confiscating criminal assets can be brought to nought. Notwithstanding its importance, only limited attention has been given to the topic. Recently, EU institutions have shown an increasing interest toward a peculiar form of disposal, which involves giving criminal proceeds back to the communities affected by crime and promoting their use in line with communal needs: social reuse. So, for example, Directive 2014/42/EU invites Member States to ‘consider taking measures allowing confiscated property to be used for public interest or social purposes’. This article responds to these questions: which Member States envisage the social reuse of confiscated assets? Could other Member States adopt it and, if so, under which conditions? And what about acceding countries, using the Republic of Macedonia as a case study?

Vettori, B., Misoski, B., Social reuse of confiscated assets in the EU: current experiences and potential for its adoption by other EU and non-EU countries, in Fiti, T., Koevski, G. (ed.), LIBER AMICORUM. Studia in honorem academici Vlado Kambovski septuagesimo anno (MCMXXXIX-MMXIX), Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts; University “Ss. Ciryl and Methodius”, Faculty of Law “Iustinianus Primus”,, Skopje 2019: 721- 738 [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/142028]

Social reuse of confiscated assets in the EU: current experiences and potential for its adoption by other EU and non-EU countries

Barbara Vettori
;
2019

Abstract

An effective and efficient disposal of assets confiscated from criminals is crucial to ensure that confiscation policies reach their expected objectives. If any problems arise in the last phase of confiscation proceedings, the efforts made by the criminal justice system in tracing, seizing and confiscating criminal assets can be brought to nought. Notwithstanding its importance, only limited attention has been given to the topic. Recently, EU institutions have shown an increasing interest toward a peculiar form of disposal, which involves giving criminal proceeds back to the communities affected by crime and promoting their use in line with communal needs: social reuse. So, for example, Directive 2014/42/EU invites Member States to ‘consider taking measures allowing confiscated property to be used for public interest or social purposes’. This article responds to these questions: which Member States envisage the social reuse of confiscated assets? Could other Member States adopt it and, if so, under which conditions? And what about acceding countries, using the Republic of Macedonia as a case study?
Inglese
LIBER AMICORUM. Studia in honorem academici Vlado Kambovski septuagesimo anno (MCMXXXIX-MMXIX)
9786082032610
Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts; University “Ss. Ciryl and Methodius”, Faculty of Law “Iustinianus Primus”,
Vettori, B., Misoski, B., Social reuse of confiscated assets in the EU: current experiences and potential for its adoption by other EU and non-EU countries, in Fiti, T., Koevski, G. (ed.), LIBER AMICORUM. Studia in honorem academici Vlado Kambovski septuagesimo anno (MCMXXXIX-MMXIX), Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts; University “Ss. Ciryl and Methodius”, Faculty of Law “Iustinianus Primus”,, Skopje 2019: 721- 738 [http://hdl.handle.net/10807/142028]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10807/142028
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