In older age, frailty is a detrimental transitional status of the aging process featuring an increased susceptibility to stressors defined by a clinical reduction of homoeostatic reserves. Multidimensional frailty phenotypes have been associated with all-cause dementia, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer's disease (AD), AD neuropathology, vascular dementia, and non-AD dementias. In the present article, we reviewed current evidence on the existing links among depressive and biopsychosocial frailty phenotypes and late-life cognitive disorders, also examining common pathways and mechanisms underlying these links. The depressive frailty phenotype suggested by the construct of late-life depression (LLD) plus physical frailty is poorly operationalized. The biopsychosocial frailty phenotype, with its coexistent biological/physical and psychosocial dimensions, defines a biological aging status and includes motivational, emotional, and socioeconomic domains. Shared biological pathways/substrates among depressive and biopsychosocial frailty phenotypes and late-life cognitive disorders are hypothesized to be inflammatory and cardiometabolic processes, together with multimorbidity, loneliness, mitochondrial dysfunction, dopaminergic neurotransmission, specific personality traits, lack of subjective/objective social support, and neuroendocrine dysregulation. The cognitive frailty phenotype, combining frailty and cognitive impairment, may be a risk factor for LLD and vice versa, and a construct of depressive frailty linking physical frailty and LLD may be a good dementia predictor. Frailty assessment may enable clinicians to better target the pharmacological and psychological treatment of LLD. Given the epidemiological links of biopsychosocial frailty with dementia and MCI, multidomain interventions might contribute to delay the onset of late-life cognitive disorders and other adverse health-related outcomes, such as institutionalization, more frequent hospitalization, disability, and mortality.

Panza, F., Solfrizzi, V., Sardone, R., Dibello, V., Castellana, F., Zupo, R., Stallone, R., Lampignano, L., Bortone, I., Mollica, A., Berardino, G., Ruan, Q., Altamura, M., Bellomo, A., Daniele, A., Lozupone, M., Depressive and Biopsychosocial Frailty Phenotypes: Impact on Late-life Cognitive Disorders, <<JOURNAL OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE>>, 2023; 94 (3): 879-898. [doi:10.3233/JAD-230312] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/257944]

Depressive and Biopsychosocial Frailty Phenotypes: Impact on Late-life Cognitive Disorders

Daniele, Antonio;
2023

Abstract

In older age, frailty is a detrimental transitional status of the aging process featuring an increased susceptibility to stressors defined by a clinical reduction of homoeostatic reserves. Multidimensional frailty phenotypes have been associated with all-cause dementia, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer's disease (AD), AD neuropathology, vascular dementia, and non-AD dementias. In the present article, we reviewed current evidence on the existing links among depressive and biopsychosocial frailty phenotypes and late-life cognitive disorders, also examining common pathways and mechanisms underlying these links. The depressive frailty phenotype suggested by the construct of late-life depression (LLD) plus physical frailty is poorly operationalized. The biopsychosocial frailty phenotype, with its coexistent biological/physical and psychosocial dimensions, defines a biological aging status and includes motivational, emotional, and socioeconomic domains. Shared biological pathways/substrates among depressive and biopsychosocial frailty phenotypes and late-life cognitive disorders are hypothesized to be inflammatory and cardiometabolic processes, together with multimorbidity, loneliness, mitochondrial dysfunction, dopaminergic neurotransmission, specific personality traits, lack of subjective/objective social support, and neuroendocrine dysregulation. The cognitive frailty phenotype, combining frailty and cognitive impairment, may be a risk factor for LLD and vice versa, and a construct of depressive frailty linking physical frailty and LLD may be a good dementia predictor. Frailty assessment may enable clinicians to better target the pharmacological and psychological treatment of LLD. Given the epidemiological links of biopsychosocial frailty with dementia and MCI, multidomain interventions might contribute to delay the onset of late-life cognitive disorders and other adverse health-related outcomes, such as institutionalization, more frequent hospitalization, disability, and mortality.
2023
Inglese
Panza, F., Solfrizzi, V., Sardone, R., Dibello, V., Castellana, F., Zupo, R., Stallone, R., Lampignano, L., Bortone, I., Mollica, A., Berardino, G., Ruan, Q., Altamura, M., Bellomo, A., Daniele, A., Lozupone, M., Depressive and Biopsychosocial Frailty Phenotypes: Impact on Late-life Cognitive Disorders, <<JOURNAL OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE>>, 2023; 94 (3): 879-898. [doi:10.3233/JAD-230312] [https://hdl.handle.net/10807/257944]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10807/257944
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